Child Maltreatment and High Risk Families

By Julie Taylor; Anne Lazenbatt | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 2
Understanding violence and the
effects of violence

Introduction

As stated in the previous chapter, child maltreatment is one of the most serious events undermining healthy psychological well-being and development, and no other social risk factor has a stronger association with developmental psychopathology (Osofsky and Lieberman, 2011).

Child abuse or neglect and general trauma, including witnessing
violence, alter normal child development and, without interven-
tion, can have lifelong consequences (Scannapieco and Connell-
Carrick, 2005)
.

This chapter discusses the physical and psychological effects of different forms of maltreatment and shows how the consequences of child abuse are serious and significant: for the individual; for society as a whole; and potentially for future generations. It provides evidence that infancy is a window of opportunity for preventative interventions and a crucial time to reduce later developmental difficulties, and encourage stronger infant–parent relationships. Controversial issues such as ‘Shaken Baby Syndrome’, ‘Female genital mutilation/cutting’, ‘Filicide’, Fabricated and Induced Illness (FII) are all debated and the consequences highlighted for children and families.

The effects of this violence show that an average of twenty-three children under one are killed each year in the UK (Scottish Government, 2010; Smith, 2011; Police Service of Northern Ireland, 2011) and data from Serious Case Reviews (SCRs) in England and Wales consistently highlight that close to 50% of all maltreatment-related deaths and serious injuries involve infants under one, with a substantial proportion being of babies of three months or younger (Department of Education, 2010). Parents are almost always the perpetrators, with infants being eight times more likely to be killed than older children (Smith, 2011). However, this may only be the ‘tip of the iceberg’, and it is suggested

-27-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Child Maltreatment and High Risk Families
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 128

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.