5
Further reading

Editions

In addition to the standard Cabinet Edition (1878–80), published under the editorial supervision of the author herself (see Criticism, p. 105), and the modern critical Clarendon Edition (1980–) (see Criticism, pp. 118–19), almost all of George Eliot’s works are easily available in numerous good and frequently reprinted paperback editions, most of which include useful introductions and notes. The Oxford World’s Classics series includes editions of the eight major fictions, as well as of ‘The Lifted Veil’ and ‘Brother Jacob’ and of Selected Critical Writings, while Penguin Classics offers the eight major fictions, ‘The Lifted Veil’ and ‘Brother Jacob’ and Selected Essays, Poems, and Other Writings. These should not be confused with the cheap Penguin Popular Classics editions of Adam Bede, The Mill on the Floss, Silas Marner and Middlemarch, which do not have the critical apparatus of the Penguin Classics editions and are therefore less useful for a serious student of George Eliot’s work. The Everyman Library includes, apart from editions of the eight major fictions (‘The Lifted Veil’ and ‘Brother Jacob’ are included in the same volume as Silas Marner), the only modern paperback edition of Impressions of Theophrastus Such (1995). There are also very useful Norton editions of The Mill on the Floss (1994) and Middlemarch (1977, 2000).


Critical studies of individual texts

The only full-length study of Scenes of Clerical Life is by Thomas A. Noble (1965).

Although virtually all major studies of George Eliot’s fiction discuss Adam Bede at considerable length, the only book devoted specifically to that novel is an introductory critical commentary by R.T. Jones (1968). Modern editions of the novel include good introductory essays by Stephen Gill (Penguin, 1980), Leonée Ormond (Everyman, 1992) and Valentine Cunningham (Oxford, 1996). Lucie Armitt (2000) offers an overview of critical responses to the novel.

In addition to numerous collections of study notes on The Mill on the Floss, there is an introductory critical guide by Roger Ebbatson (1985) as well as a

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George Eliot
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Routledge Guides to Literature ii
  • Title Page v
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • Abbreviations, Frequently Cited Works and Cross-Referencing x
  • 1 - Life and Contexts 1
  • 2 - Works 32
  • 3 - Criticism 97
  • 4 - Chronology 150
  • 5 - Further Reading 156
  • Bibliography 159
  • Index 165
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