9
After Goffman

The writings Goffman produced in the decade following his 1953 PhD dissertation possess a coherence and unity to be expected from a relatively youthful writer newly in command of an immensely successful analytical strategy trained on a novel topic matter. The project begins to waver in the mid- to late 1960s as the original seam is worked out and Goffman needed to find new resources to take forward his sociological venture. Around this time Goffman faced the challenge posed by Garfinkel’s ethnomethodology and especially the conversation analysis of Sacks, Schegloff and Jefferson who showed that a terrain similar to Goffman’s own could be investigated by rigorous empirical techniques. The use of transcribed taped data made the observation of interactional particulars more a matter of discipline than a talented eye and permitted the discovery of reproducible findings. Goffman’s star began to rise again following his relocation to the East Coast and the publication of Frame Analysis. The sociolinguistic influences of Labov, Hymes and others around the University of Pennsylvania stimulated ‘fresh talk’ from Goffman. It is difficult to guess how Goffman’s project might have developed had he lived longer. The casino research might have been written up in full, but he was already 15 years away from the fieldwork. There might have been a greater engagement with bodies of data such as the advertising images used in Gender Advertisements or the ‘bloopers’ extensively referred to in ‘Radio talk’. But given the distinctiveness of the formal, conceptual approach that Goffman had developed to this point, any drastic shift in

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Erving Goffman
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Table of Contents v
  • Acknowledgements vii
  • 1 - Goffman’s Project 1
  • 2 - Origins and Emergence 12
  • 3 - Interaction’s Orderliness 33
  • 4 - Framing Experience 55
  • 5 - Asylums 68
  • 6 - Spoiled Identity and Gender Difference 84
  • 7 - Self 95
  • 8 - Methods and Textuality 110
  • 9 - After Goffman 125
  • Further Reading 130
  • References 133
  • Index 143
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