Criminal Justice Theory: An Introduction

By Roger Hopkins Burke | Go to book overview

7 Youth justice in modern society

The contemporary youth justice system in England and Wales was established by the New Labour flagship criminal justice legislation, the Crime and Disorder Act 1998, and was in many ways the culmination and coming together of often contrasting and conflicting themes that had been in existence and incrementally developed over a period of a century and a half. This chapter observes that in order to theorise the establishment of the contemporary system – or why it is that it came into existence in the form that it did – it is essential to locate the discussion in an historical context because essentially the debates, discourses and political solutions that emerged in the past are very similar to those of the present time. It is thus impossible to make legitimate sense of the contemporary era without reflection on the past. Fears about rising crime rates among children and young people have been periodically repeated throughout history in all modern societies with the present continuously compared unfavourably with the peaceful days of a halcyon non-existent golden age (Humphries, 1981; Pearson, 1983). The emphasis on ‘appropriate parenting’ in contemporary society is also nothing new and the notion that ‘the family’ is in ‘crisis’, and/or that parents are ‘failing’, is a ‘cyclical phenomenon with a very long history’ (Day-Sclater and Piper, 2000: 135), while the ‘parenting theme’ (Gelsthorpe, 1999) has enjoyed and continues to enjoy prominence. It is therefore essential to consider the issue of delinquent and indeed disorderly children and young people, and the nature of the official response that has evolved to deal with these issues, in an historical context.

This chapter revisits the four models of criminal justice development in modern society in order to make theoretical sense of the always contentious and topical issue of the involvement of children and young people in criminality and the subsequent response of the criminal justice authorities to their transgressions. It commences with a brief discussion of the historical development of the concept of young people in the modern era – from their social construction as children and adolescents – and considers the various, varied strategies that were introduced in order to educate, discipline, control and construct them in the interests of myriad different interest groups, not least, but not exclusively, industrial capitalism, and examines their deviance, ‘offending behaviour’ and the consequential societal juvenile justice response from the beginnings of industrial modernity to the present day.

-172-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Criminal Justice Theory: An Introduction
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Criminal Justice Theory i
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • 1- Introduction - Modernity and Criminal Justice 1
  • 2- Explaining Crime and Criminal Behaviour 29
  • 3- The Philosophy of Law and Legal Ethics 58
  • 4- Policing Modern Society 84
  • 5- The Legal Process in Modern Society 111
  • 6- Punishment in Modern Society 144
  • 7- Youth Justice in Modern Society 172
  • 8- Conclusions - The Future of Criminal Justice 194
  • Notes 215
  • References 222
  • Author Index 249
  • Subject Index 256
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 267

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.