Criminal Justice Theory: An Introduction

By Roger Hopkins Burke | Go to book overview

Subject index
Page numbers in italic refer to tables
abortion, Muslim law 216n8
actuarial justice 203
adjudication, rule of 64
adolescence 27, 197; historical context 173–4; social construction of 13–14
adultery 82
African Americans: controlling institutions 207–8; hyperincarceration 209–11; and imprisonment 206–7, 220n4; labour extraction 208; social seclusion 208; violence against 208
African Charter on Human and People’s Rights for Africa 141
alcohol, links with crime 36
altered biological state theories 36
ambiguity, moral 104
American Convention on Human Rights for the Americas 142
American Legal Realists 138
analytic jurisprudence 26, 58, 59–68, 196; conceptual analysis 59; definition 59; Dworkin and 66–9; legal positivism 62–5, 66; natural law theory 59–62
anomie theory 41–4, 45
Anti-Social Behaviour Order (ASBO) 192, 220n9
approximate equality 63
arbitrary will 164
argument from consent, the 72
argument from general utility, the 72
argument from gratitude, the 72
aristocracy, the, loss of authority 2, 11
artistic interpretation 67
Assistant Recorders 115
asylum, the, development of 14–15
attachment 53
Augustine, St. 135
autonomy 76
Bank of Credit and Commerce International 201
basic goods 70
behavioural change 31
behavioural learning theories 37
beliefs 53
benevolence 15
biochemical theories 35–6
biological positivism 34–7
black migration 213
blackness, and criminality 209–10
Blair, Tony 55, 220n9
blood sugar levels 35–6
Bloody Code, The 4, 6
Blue Lamp, The (film) 95
Bow Street Runners 88
British Crime Survey 99, 190
Brixton riots 103
broken home, the 37
broken windows theory 102–5
Bulger, James 185
bureaucratic criminal justice model 124–5, 126
bureaucratic due process criminal justice model 127–31
bureaucracy, extension of 11
capital offences 87–8
capital punishment 82, 217n9; The Bloody Code 4–5, 6; children 176; Islamic jurisprudence 82; pre-modern 4
capital statutes 4
capitalism 21

-256-

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Criminal Justice Theory: An Introduction
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Criminal Justice Theory i
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • 1- Introduction - Modernity and Criminal Justice 1
  • 2- Explaining Crime and Criminal Behaviour 29
  • 3- The Philosophy of Law and Legal Ethics 58
  • 4- Policing Modern Society 84
  • 5- The Legal Process in Modern Society 111
  • 6- Punishment in Modern Society 144
  • 7- Youth Justice in Modern Society 172
  • 8- Conclusions - The Future of Criminal Justice 194
  • Notes 215
  • References 222
  • Author Index 249
  • Subject Index 256
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