The History of the European Union: Origins of a Trans- and Supranational Polity 1950-72

By Wolfram Kaiser; Brigitte Leucht et al. | Go to book overview
UACES Contemporary European Studies SeriesEdited by Tanja Börzel, Free University of Berlin, Michelle Cini, University of Bristol and Roger Scully, University of Wales, Aberystwyth, on behalf of the University Association for Contemporary European StudiesEditorial Board: Grainne De Búrca, European University Institute and Columbia University; Andreas Føllesdal, Norwegian Centre for Human Rights, University of Oslo; Peter Holmes, University of Sussex; Liesbet Hooghe, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam; David Phinnemore, Queen’s University Belfast; Mark Pollack, Temple University; Ben Rosamond, University of Warwick; Vivien Ann Schmidt, University of Boston; Jo Shaw, University of Edinburgh; Mike Smith, University of Loughborough and Loukas Tsoukalis, ELIAMEP, University of Athens and European University Institute.The primary objective of the new Contemporary European Studies series is to provide a research outlet for scholars of European Studies from all disciplines. The series publishes important scholarly works and aims to forge for itself an international reputation.
1. The EU and Conflict Resolution Promoting peace in the backyard Nathalie Tocci
2. Central Banking Governance in the European Union A comparative analysis Lucia Quaglia
3. New Security Issues in Northern Europe The Nordic and Baltic states and the ESDP Edited by Clive Archer
4. The European Union and International Development The politics of foreign aid Maurizio Carbone
5. The End of European Integration Anti-Europeanism examined Paul Taylor
6. The European Union and the Asia-Pacific Media, public and elite perceptions of the EU Edited by Natalia Chaban and Martin Holland
7. The History of the European Union Origins of a trans- and supranational polity 1950–72 Edited by Wolfram Kaiser, Brigitte Leucht and Morten Rasmussen

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The History of the European Union: Origins of a Trans- and Supranational Polity 1950-72
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