The History of the European Union: Origins of a Trans- and Supranational Polity 1950-72

By Wolfram Kaiser; Brigitte Leucht et al. | Go to book overview

1   Origins of a European polity
A new research agenda for
European Union history

Wolfram Kaiser, Brigitte Leucht and Morten Rasmussen

This book sets out to re-conceptualize the history of the present-day European Union (EU) as the gradual emergence over time of a European-level polity: a supranational political system with a complex institutional set-up and policymaking structures embedded in what could be called an incipient transnational political society of intense networking and informal political co-ordination and governance. With their predominant focus on current Community politics, political scientists have characterized the EU as a supranational political system of multilevel governance.1 Crucially, however, its historical origins are in the formative phase of core Europe integration in the European Coal and Steel Community (ECSC) founded in 1951–52, and the European Economic Community (EEC) created in 1957–58, before its first enlargement by Britain, Denmark and Ireland in 1972–73. Integration in this formative phase created a broad corridor for institutional and policy options and developments up to the present. This book recasts the way we conceive of these historical origins of the present-day European polity. It does so by combining two chapters on network analysis and institutionalist theories as recent theoretical and conceptual approaches to understanding the EU as heuristic devices for developing sophisticated historical narratives of European integration with eight source-based transnational and supranational case studies followed by a concluding chapter on the scope for cross-disciplinary co-operation between a new history of the EU and social science research.

Starting in earnest with the creation of an industrial customs union after 1957–58, European integration has encroached so much upon the member-states and affected EU citizens in manifold ways that it should be inconceivable that historians of the economic, social and political history of postwar (Western) Europe and its nation-states should write about their specialized topics without sophisticated reference to this transnational and supranational context. Yet, much historical work on contemporary Europe more generally is as ill-informed about the history of the EU2 as even many of those social scientists who actually argue from different theoretical perspectives that its historical origins and evolution are crucial for understanding contemporary issues of EU politics at the start of the twenty-first century. In large measure, this sorry state of affairs is due to the fact that much of the historiography of European integration has been conceptually

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The History of the European Union: Origins of a Trans- and Supranational Polity 1950-72
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 228

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.