Introduction to Psychotherapy: An Outline of Psychodynamic Principles and Practice

By Anthony Bateman; Dennis Brown et al. | Go to book overview

Foreword to the first edition

We have often been asked to recommend some introductory text in psychotherapy, and felt at a loss. Freud’s papers on technique (1912a, 1913a) or Bion’s (1961) Experiences in Groups make fascinating if not essential reading for those embarking as therapists on formal individual or group psychotherapy. Yet we were not aware of any one book – certainly none written by psychotherapists in this country – which answered basic questions such as ‘what is psychotherapy about?’. This book was born out of our attempts to answer that question and to convey something about dynamic psychotherapy to medical students and newcomers to psychiatry from various disciplines. We have been unashamedly simple in trying to delineate basic psychodynamic principles in Part I. We have described something of the range of methods based on these principles in Part II. We do not say very much about the practice of psychotherapy – that is ‘how to do it’ – for we believe that this can only really be learnt by embarking on the journey of exploration, either as patient or as therapist under regular supervision.

We are both psychoanalysts working part-time as consultant psychotherapists in a teaching hospital psychiatric unit where all current opinions and treatments in psychiatry are represented. In our view Freud’s work and psychoanalysis have provided the spring which has nourished all later forms of dynamic psychotherapy, be they individual or group psychotherapy, marital or family therapy. With the proliferation of new forms of psychotherapy, both within and beyond the fringe of psychiatry, we felt some simple statement of basic aims and principles would help to orientate ourselves and, we hope, others.

The psychoanalytic view is, among other things, essentially a developmental one. It sees man against the evolutionary background

-vii-

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Introduction to Psychotherapy: An Outline of Psychodynamic Principles and Practice
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Introduction to Psychotherapy 4th Edition i
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Foreword to the First Edition vii
  • Foreword to the Second Edition ix
  • Foreword to the Third Edition xi
  • Foreword to the Fourth Edition xiii
  • Prologue xvii
  • Part I - Psychodynamic Principles 1
  • Part II - Psychodynamic Practice 91
  • Appendix 275
  • References 279
  • Name Index 315
  • Subject Index 325
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