Introduction to Psychotherapy: An Outline of Psychodynamic Principles and Practice

By Anthony Bateman; Dennis Brown et al. | Go to book overview

Part I
Psychodynamic principles

INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHODYNAMIC
PRINCIPLES

It is widely agreed that about a third of all patients who go to their family doctor have primarily emotional problems. About half of these will have a recognizable psychiatric condition, with two-thirds of them having unmet needs. But only one in twenty is referred to a psychiatrist (Boardman, Henshaw, & Willmott, 2004). A still smaller proportion will be referred on for formal psychotherapy in the National Health Service (NHS). However, psychotherapy at varying levels will be appropriate for some patients at each of these stages. We will discuss these different levels and types of psychotherapy in further detail in Part II. The term ‘psychotherapy’ is used in both general and special ways; it includes forms of treatment for emotional and psychiatric disorders that rely on talking and the relationship with the therapist, by contrast to physical methods of treatment (such as drugs and electroconvulsive treatment).

Most psychotherapy in the general sense is carried out informally in ‘heart-to-heart’ conversations with friends and confidants. ‘Everyone who tries to encourage a despondent friend or to reassure a panicky child practices psychotherapy’ (Alexander, 1957, p. 148). Well-worn sayings such as ‘a trouble shared is a trouble halved’ make sense to everyone. Such help is more likely to be sought in the first instance from the most readily available helpgiver, such as a friend, family doctor, priest, or social worker, rather than from a psychiatrist or psychotherapist. In the medical field, the art of sympathetic listening has always been the basis of good doctoring. There has been a risk that this might be

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Introduction to Psychotherapy: An Outline of Psychodynamic Principles and Practice
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Introduction to Psychotherapy 4th Edition i
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Foreword to the First Edition vii
  • Foreword to the Second Edition ix
  • Foreword to the Third Edition xi
  • Foreword to the Fourth Edition xiii
  • Prologue xvii
  • Part I - Psychodynamic Principles 1
  • Part II - Psychodynamic Practice 91
  • Appendix 275
  • References 279
  • Name Index 315
  • Subject Index 325
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 338

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.