Team Psychology in Sports: Theory and Practice

By Stewart Cotterill | Go to book overview

1
INTRODUCTION

Introduction

Teams in sporting competition win or lose based on their ability to perform on the day, and the extent to which they defeat their opponent. There are many examples across multiple sports where the most talented teams have lost to the ‘underdogs’. Games can change as a result of momentary slips in concentration, and teams can become paralysed by the pressure of the big occasion. Understanding the factors that can cause a team to fail underpins the development of effective strategies to make sure that this failure is not repeated in the future. Taking this one step further can ensure that well-planned and well-thought-through strategies can prevent these failures from happening at all. Indeed, most sports teams will not reach many finals or frequently be in a position to win a league or a title. In view of this, taking the opportunity to learn from its mistakes might already be too late for the team. It thus makes more sense to plan effectively from the start, in essence having all the bases covered, to allow the team to achieve its potential rather than to try and fix a problem after the event (closing the gate after the horse has bolted). Whilst the retrospective approach is obviously possible, and many examples exist of teams who return to be successful, many other teams don’t get another opportunity. It therefore makes sense for the team to do all it can to plan and prepare effectively to achieve the greatest potential for success. Team planning and effective preparation for the main factors that impact upon performance underpin consistent performance when it matters in many successful teams. For sports teams these factors can be grouped into five main categories: technical, tactical, physical, psychological, and environmental factors. The team that considers each of these factors in turn will stand the greatest chance of living up to its potential and ultimately being successful and realizing its potential.

There is an increasing array of textbooks in sport psychology, but very few of these focus exclusively on the team/group performance of sports teams. Many of these

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Team Psychology in Sports: Theory and Practice
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Figures viii
  • Tables ix
  • Preface x
  • Acknowledgements xiii
  • 1- Introduction 1
  • 2- Team Planning and Effectiveness 8
  • 3- Developing a Positive Team Environment 22
  • 4- Role Clarity and Role Acceptance 36
  • 5- Developing Effective Team Communication 48
  • 6- Cohesion in Sport 65
  • 7- Motivating the Team 78
  • 8- Managing Emotions in Team Sports 92
  • 9- Momentum in Sport 106
  • 10- Effective Team Leadership 120
  • 11- Mental and Emotional Recovery 133
  • Reference 146
  • Index 166
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 170

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.