Team Psychology in Sports: Theory and Practice

By Stewart Cotterill | Go to book overview

6
COHESION IN SPORT

Introduction

The relationships between the individuals in a team are crucial to the overall success of that team. Successful teams throughout history have been characterized by their ability to gel and perform as a group. Many coaches have an understanding of what that elusive quality is, but are less clear on how to enhance it. Cohesion refers to the set of factors that create a close-knit, well-performing team. Historically cohesion has been identified as the most important small-group variable (Loughead and Hardy, 2006). As a result, unlocking the secrets of cohesion can help to foster more effective and successful teams. A fundamental factor in the study of team cohesion is an understanding of group dynamics (Cox, 2002). Understanding both the group and the individual is crucial to understanding cohesion. It is also important to acknowledge the fact that players in the team come and go. This process in turn continually changes the make-up and quality of a team (Matheson et al., 1997). As a result, this process of team building to enhance cohesion must be seen as a continuous process. This chapter will seek to explore what cohesion is and how it can impact upon team functioning and team performance. The following sections will explore the evidence base for cohesion and the different factors that both influence and determine its development. Finally, this chapter will explore techniques and strategies that can be applied to enhance levels of cohesion and performance in a team setting.


What is cohesion?

Cartwright (1968) in his book chapter on group cohesion highlighted a number of factors that are usually present in normally functioning teams. These include: working harder, appearing happier, making sacrifices, and having higher levels of interaction. Cartwright described the presence of these characteristics as ‘we-ness’ because in these

-65-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Team Psychology in Sports: Theory and Practice
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Figures viii
  • Tables ix
  • Preface x
  • Acknowledgements xiii
  • 1- Introduction 1
  • 2- Team Planning and Effectiveness 8
  • 3- Developing a Positive Team Environment 22
  • 4- Role Clarity and Role Acceptance 36
  • 5- Developing Effective Team Communication 48
  • 6- Cohesion in Sport 65
  • 7- Motivating the Team 78
  • 8- Managing Emotions in Team Sports 92
  • 9- Momentum in Sport 106
  • 10- Effective Team Leadership 120
  • 11- Mental and Emotional Recovery 133
  • Reference 146
  • Index 166
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 170

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.