The Politics of Reality Television: Global Perspectives

By Marwan M. Kraidy; Katherine Sender | Go to book overview

Chapter 9
World citizens “à la française”
Star Academy and the negotiation
of “French” identities

Fabienne Darling-Wolf

The invasion of reality television programs on the world-wide popular cultural scene is the logical fulfillment of processes of globalization with which international communication scholars have long been preoccupied. Indeed, the fact that the genre’s attraction is predicated on its successful adaptation of global formats to local environments makes it the perfect exemplar of twentyfirst-century transnational capitalism at its best – in all its glocalized, deterritorialized, indigenized and disjunctive messiness. As such, reality television texts provide a particularly fruitful terrain on which to explore transnational dynamics in relationship to various local environments and advance our understanding of the local “as the space where global forces become recognizable in form and practice as they are enmeshed in local human subjectivity and social agency.”1

Employing the case of the adaptation of the Endemol Star Academy format to the French environment – the first in a series of such adaptations that would eventually spread through fifty nations – as a specific example, this essay proposes to tease out some of the “global-local articulations”2 of reality television. Understanding Star Academy as a propositional text – i.e. as a text that is generating claims about the world – this analysis is particularly concerned with the implicitly propositional statements3 the show is making about the local in relationship to the broad concept of “the global,” as well as to other local environments. This concern leads to a set of more specific questions this work attempts to address: how and where do claims about the local and the global intersect in the text? In what ways do such claims relate to the format of reality television? What are the translocal dynamics at work in the text’s engagement with the global? How are participants (and, by extension, viewers) positioned within the global environment?

But before these can be addressed, Star Academy’s impressive success must be placed within the broader context of reality television’s recent explosion.


The context of reality TV

The product of a combination of deregulation policies, an increased fragmentation of television audiences, efforts on the part of traditional networks to reclaim

-127-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Politics of Reality Television: Global Perspectives
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 225

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.