The Economies of Latin America: New Cliometric Data

By César Yáñez; Albert Carreras | Go to book overview

INDEX
account statistics, national, 22, 84
African slaves in the Indies, 132
agricultural activities, no machinery, 11
agricultural goods, protection for farmers, Europe, 30
agricultural machinery export and import, 69, 71
agricultural machinery industry, Argentina main market for US, 202n14
agricultural specialization in Argentina, 79
agricultural trade liberalization, 38
agro-exportation, 98–9
AMECO database, 91
Anglo-Saxon system, reporting of imports, ‘general trade’, 46
Argentina, Brazil, Mexico
durable goods, 179–90
economy today, 8, 14–15
main market for US, 202
nineteenth-century (1850–1913) economic performance, 24
Argentina and Chile, most advanced in electrification, 82
automobiles, 188
domestic goods, 183–4
bagasse, as fuel, 135, 142, 144
banana exports, 93, 98
Baring crisis, investment collapse, 1890, 77
bilateral trade data, Colombia and United States, 159
biofuel crisis, Cuba, 1840–60, 137
biomass energies, dependence on, 9, 137, 139
Bolivia
central government, fiscal revenues, sources, 169, 175–7
imports from US, 61
public revenues, 167
Brazil, durable goods, 179–90
Bretton Woods agreement, 19–40
national accounts for world, 22
British coal supply to Latin America and the Caribbean, 63
British colonial past of USA, 13
British trade
dependence on, Argentina, Brazil, Uruguay, 64
importation dependence before First World War, 59–60
Bryan-Chamarro Treaty, 1916
canal building, Nicaragua, 103
bunkering, records of imports and exports, 45
capital formation, 69
capital goods imports, 122–7
Chile, 119–30
Caribbean backwardness, origins, 2, 20–2
causality test results, 127–8
cement consumption, 59
impact of First World War, 97–8
cereal cultivation in Argentina, 75
cereal exports of Chile, 110
charcoal in economic activities, 11
Chile, 105–17
colonial elite, 107, 109–11
durable goods, 179–90
economy today, 8, 14–15
emancipation, 117
export of coal to Bolivia, 63
growth from 1750 to 1846, 112–13
political stability, 111
‘Portaliano state’, 212n29

-233-

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