The Evolution of Human Behavior

By Carl J. Warden | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VI
RACE AND CIVILISATION

IT SHOULD be clear from the foregoing account that the racial diversification of modern man had taken place long before the beginning of historic times. Perhaps we should recall the main series of events which led thereto in order to be able to place contemporary racial groups in their proper temporal perspective. As we have noted, all existing peoples belong to the sapiens branch of the human stem. This large-brained species became distinct from other species of the genus Homo about the middle of the Pleistocene epoch, or perhaps even earlier. The human stock at this time--certainly no less than a half million years ago--was a generalised and plastic type capable of further specialisation in detail in several directions. Modern man at that remote period was neither negroid, mongoloid, nor caucasoid, but possessed a complex of more or less neutral characteristics in so far as present races are concerned. It is obvious that the basic similarities of contemporary races can be traced back to this remote common ancestry. Such differences as now exist between them were brought about by the later evolution of various groups along distinctive lines under divergent conditions of life. The first and most important stage of raciation was brought about by the primary migrations of peoples from the common center of dispersion in central Asia or elsewhere. These peoples became diversified into the three great racial stocks--negroid, mongoloid, and cau-

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The Evolution of Human Behavior
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • Chapter I- Some Problems of Human Evolution 1
  • Chapter II- The Natural Kinship of Man and Animal 32
  • Chapter III- When Anthropoid Became Human 67
  • Chapter IV- Traces of Early Man 100
  • Chapter V- The Coming of Modern Man 135
  • Chapter VI- Race and Civilisation 177
  • Chapter VII- Present Trends in Evolution 213
  • Bibliography 235
  • Index 241
  • Index 243
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