The Evolution of Human Behavior

By Carl J. Warden | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VII
PRESENT TRENDS IN EVOLUTION

PERHAPS no question is of more intrinsic interest to many of us than that regarding the immediate and remote future of mankind. This interest naturally centers around the advanced races which represent the high point of cultural evolution up to the present time. Some writers seem to believe that human evolution is now complete and that further variations of a bodily sort are not to be expected in the future. They would say that human evolution hereafter is to be restricted to various phases of cultural achievement, while man as a biological being is to remain as he is now. Such a view, however, is not only unsound in principle but is contrary to the concrete facts as we find them. To begin with, there can be no such thing as continued existence without bodily change in any living thing. The individual must change from year to year and the species must change from generation to generation. The universal law of life is mutability within limits, and there is not the slightest reason to suppose that the human organism is exempt from its operation. It is evident that the environment of civilised man is far different from that of his immediate and remote ancestors. The shift in external conditions since the beginning of historic times has been relatively rapid and in some cases very important. It may safely be taken for granted that these changes in the environment have brought about further evolution of a biological sort. Our primary problem, in

-213-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Evolution of Human Behavior
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • Chapter I- Some Problems of Human Evolution 1
  • Chapter II- The Natural Kinship of Man and Animal 32
  • Chapter III- When Anthropoid Became Human 67
  • Chapter IV- Traces of Early Man 100
  • Chapter V- The Coming of Modern Man 135
  • Chapter VI- Race and Civilisation 177
  • Chapter VII- Present Trends in Evolution 213
  • Bibliography 235
  • Index 241
  • Index 243
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 248

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.