The Routledge Companion to the Tudor Age

By Rosemary O’Day | Go to book overview

8
LOCAL GOVERNMENT

The shires, like the Church, were administered by the Crown via a system of local government officers and courts. The Tudors possessed no permanent, expert and salaried bureaucracy. They relied instead upon the interest of the local elite (broadly speaking, the gentry rather than the overmighty nobility who might be perceived as a challenge to strong royal government) in stable, peaceable government and paternalistic protection of the people to run the country. In theory, the system of Assizes complemented and monitored the work of the Justices of the Peace. In some areas, the Crown was represented by a Council (e.g. the Council of the North) and JPs and Assize Judges worked with that institution.


Special problems of the Borders

Unsettled border regions. Threat of foreign invasion from Ireland and Scotland. Dangerous independence of the Marcher lords who defended kingdom against such invasion – for example: Dacre, Percy and Neville families in the Northern Borders; Courtenays in Devon and the West; palatine jurisdictions in Cheshire and Lancashire. There is some evidence that Henry VII proposed a council for the Midlands. Certainly his mother, Margaret Beaufort, exercised regional jurisdiction from Collyweston, Stamford between 1499 and 1505.


The North before 1530

Richard, Duke of Gloucester, and his private Council administered the North for his brother Edward IV.

1484Richard III appointed Earl of Lincoln Lieutenant and gave him a council to administer the region with formal status as a court of law.
1485Henry VII relied on Percy family until Northumberland’s murder in 1489.
1487–c. 1509Intermittent Council.
1509–22Lapse of central control in North.
1522Wolsey aware of need for buffer against Scots.
1525Duke of Richmond made Lieutenant and given a Council, staffed by lawyers and civil servants, to administer royal lands in North and exercise wide civil and criminal jurisdiction. Ineffectual in face of local opposition.

-101-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Routledge Companion to the Tudor Age
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Routledge Companions to History ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction ix
  • Abbreviations xiii
  • 1 - General Chronology 1
  • 2 - Rebellions against the Tudors- Chronologies 37
  • 3 - Ireland 39
  • 4 - The World of Learning 44
  • 5 - Central Government- (1) the Monarchy and the Royal Household 69
  • 6 - Central Government- (2) Parliament 79
  • 7 - Central Courts 94
  • 8 - Local Government 101
  • 9 - Structure of the Church in England 110
  • 10 - Ecclesiastical Courts and Commissions 116
  • 11 - Population and Population Distribution 127
  • 12.1 - Biographies Monarchs and Their Consorts 130
  • 12.2 - Biographies Biographical Index 137
  • 13 - Genealogical Tables 232
  • 14 - Tudor Titles- Who Was Who? 244
  • Glossary 254
  • 16 - Bibliographies 289
  • 17 - Debates 312
  • 18 - Maps 323
  • Index 326
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 344

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.