The Routledge Companion to the Tudor Age

By Rosemary O’Day | Go to book overview

GLOSSARY

Accession Day Tilts By the 1570s the Queen’s accession day, 17 November, had become a national holiday marked by elaborate tournaments under the control of Sir Henry Lee (q.v.). These court tournaments revived the cult of chilvalry in the interests of Protestant patriotism.

Adiaphora Greek for ‘things indifferent’. In Germany, a group of Protestants argued that certain Catholic practices (such as confirmation, extreme unction, the Mass without belief in transubstantiation and veneration of saints) might be conceded in the interests of peace without compromising essential Protestant doctrine. In England, there was some argument of this kind surrounding the use of vestments and rituals such as the cross in baptism, kneeling at the name of Jesus and the use of the ring in marriage.

Advowson Right to appoint one in holy orders to an ecclesiastical benefice. Treated under English civil law as a piece of property which could be transferred by sale or grant. See ‘Hac Vice Presentations’ and ‘Benefice’.

Affective Family Used by late twentieth-century historians to describe the family knit together by sentiment, which is thought by some (notably Lawrence Stone) to have emerged for the first time in the early modern period.

Affines (Affinity) At this time meant relations (or relationship) by marriage. See ‘Consanguinity’.

Aggregative back projection A demographic research technique that employs a computer program to work backwards in time at five-yearly intervals from reliable census data concerning size and age structure for a given population, adjusted for numbers of deaths (derived from mortality tables) and numbers of migrants within each five-year period. E.A. Wrigley & R.S. Schofield, The Population History of England 1541–1871: A Reconstruction, 1981 (paperback ed’n, Cambridge, 1989) repays careful reading and, on pages 195–207, contains a useful description and critique of the method.

All Saints’ Day (All Hallows) 1 November. An important feast of the pre-reformation church. See ‘Hallowe’en’ and All Souls’ Day’.

All Souls’ Day 2 November. An important feast of the Pre-reformation Church.

Amicable Grant Wolsey’s attempt to raise money for the French war in 1525. Without parliamentary sanction, Wolsey levied one-third of clergy goods and one-sixth of laymen’s goods. After massive demonstrations in Suffolk, Wolsey was persuaded to withdraw the tax.

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The Routledge Companion to the Tudor Age
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Routledge Companions to History ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction ix
  • Abbreviations xiii
  • 1 - General Chronology 1
  • 2 - Rebellions against the Tudors- Chronologies 37
  • 3 - Ireland 39
  • 4 - The World of Learning 44
  • 5 - Central Government- (1) the Monarchy and the Royal Household 69
  • 6 - Central Government- (2) Parliament 79
  • 7 - Central Courts 94
  • 8 - Local Government 101
  • 9 - Structure of the Church in England 110
  • 10 - Ecclesiastical Courts and Commissions 116
  • 11 - Population and Population Distribution 127
  • 12.1 - Biographies Monarchs and Their Consorts 130
  • 12.2 - Biographies Biographical Index 137
  • 13 - Genealogical Tables 232
  • 14 - Tudor Titles- Who Was Who? 244
  • Glossary 254
  • 16 - Bibliographies 289
  • 17 - Debates 312
  • 18 - Maps 323
  • Index 326
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