Benefit Analysis in Criminal Justice: An Example Application to a Statewide Drug Treatment System

By Peter A. Collins | Go to book overview

Chapter 3: Mapping the Cost-
Benefit, Collaborative Capacity,
and Social Support Nexus

INTRODUCTION

There are two main methodological pieces to this research. The first (labeled Part 1) is centered on the cost-benefit analyses, and is quantitative and outcome-driven. To give context to the cost-benefit analysis, Part 2 provides survey findings assessing the collaborative capacity and cooperative processes taking place within the ICSA group. This chapter begins with a description the cost-benefit methods, followed by a discussion on the survey methodology. It should be noted that a cost-benefit methods description does not follow the traditional format of most empirical evaluation studies. Rather, it follows the sequencing of events detailed by Welsh, Farrington, and Sherman (2001) (outlined below). Both sections provide information on sample selection, data elements, measurement strategy, sample descriptives, and the primary research hypotheses investigated.


PART 1. COST-BENEFIT METHODS

As illustrated by Welsh and colleagues (2001:5), the process of conducting economic analyses should follow a specific sequence: “(1) define the scope of the analysis; (2) obtain estimates of program effects; (3) estimate the monetary value of costs and benefits; (4) calculate present value and assess profitability; (5) describe the distribution of costs and benefits; and, (6) conduct sensitivity analysis.” The current project uses these steps as a guide in carrying out the cost-

-45-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Benefit Analysis in Criminal Justice: An Example Application to a Statewide Drug Treatment System
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 185

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.