Returning Home: Intimate Partner Violence and Reentry

By Matasha L. Harris | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 6
Reflections

Using a blended methodology that included an intersectional and comparative analytical framework, this study explores the ways in which race, gender, and class intersect to structure experiences of intimate partner violence among African American men and women during reentry after prison incarceration. While many researchers have directed their efforts toward employment, housing, healthcare, and family reunification, little attention has been directed toward African American men’s and women’s experiences of intimate partner violence during reentry. This study attempts to enhance the existing sparse literature in this area; to this end, four main questions are addressed in this study. These questions are: (1) What are the socioeconomic experiences of African American men and women during the reentry process? (2) How are their experiences similar and different? (3) What role does intimate partner violence play during the reentry process? (4) How are African American men and women’s experiences similar and different in this regard? A discussion of the findings is presented below, including implications for theory development, reentry practices, and public policy. Implications for future research are sketched in a conclusion to this final chapter.


FINDINGS

Staff interviews reveal several important findings worthy of reiteration here. Formerly incarcerated African American men and women face numerous challenges when reentering society, among them being finding and maintaining gainful employment, securing safe and affordable housing, and negotiating relationships representing the most pressing and pertinent issues. The findings reported here also reveal

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Returning Home: Intimate Partner Violence and Reentry
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Table of Contents v
  • Acknowledgements vii
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1 - Setting the Stage 11
  • Chapter 2 - The Process 37
  • Chapter 3 - Inside Look from the outside 47
  • Chapter 4 - More Than a Number- Unveiling the Mask 67
  • Chapter 5 - Violence and Reentry- Their Story 79
  • Chapter 6 - Reflections 117
  • Appendix A 129
  • Appendix B 131
  • References 137
  • Index 157
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