John Witherspoon's American Revolution: Enlightenment and Religion from the Creation of Britain to the Founding of the United States

By Gideon Mailer | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

I owe so much to Betty Wood, who first supervised me in early American history for Part I of the Cambridge Tripos, before mentoring me through graduate work and beyond. We are the closest of friends. Betty’s influence continues in the British Group of Early American Historians, which has supported and inspired me over the years. I offer particular thanks to Simon Middleton.

I am grateful for the path-defining work of the Eighteenth-Century Scottish Studies Society, especially Richard Sher, Roger Fechner, and Ned Landsman. Without Ned’s work as a reviewer, mentor, and inspiration in the held, this project would be greatly diminished.

At the University of Cambridge, I am obliged to my early Director of Studies at Peterhouse, Scott Mandelbrote, for supervision in eighteenthcentury history, and to the late Michael O’Brien for his razor-sharp thoughts and critiques. I thank the Faculty of History at Cambridge, particularly the American history subject group.

The U.K. Arts and Humanities Research Council provided financial support, and I appreciate as well the financial and intellectual support of the Master and Fellows of St. John’s College, Cambridge, during my four-year postdoctoral Title A Fellowship. At St. John’s, Sylvana Tomaselli became a special friend and mentor, always keen to discuss eighteenth-century intellectual thought, always guiding my professional path.

In Scotland, Ireland, England, and the United States, I am grateful for support, advice, and inspiration from scholars David Abulafia, Alexander Broadie, Frank Gogliano, Karen Collis, Sylvia Frey, Mark Goldie, Nancy Hewitt, Colin Kidd, James Kloppenberg, Tim Lockley, Michael Ledger Lomas, Ian McBride, the late Susan Manning, Peter Messer, Mary Beth Norton, Andrew Preston, Tom Rodgers, Sophia Rosenfeld, Steve Sarson, Brendan Simms, Tom Stammers, Hilary Stroh, Simon Szreter, William Harrison Taylor, and Peter Thompson.

At the University of Minnesota, Duluth, the College of Liberal Arts and, especially, Dean Susan Maher provided financial support as well as an environment of humanistic rigor. I thank my colleagues in the Department of History, led by Steve Matthews, for bringing me to the shores of Lake Superior and for mentoring me since I arrived in 2012. All my students, both in Cambridge and in Duluth, have helped me to refine my ideas. Thanks, in

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