Africa and the Africans in the Nineteenth Century: A Turbulent History

By Catherine Coquery-Vidrovitch; Mary Baker | Go to book overview

6
Colonial Intervention

In some parts of Africa, colonization began well before the nineteenth century. Ever since the Age of Exploration, all European maritime nations had been acquiring footholds abroad. Luanda and St. George of the Mine on the Gold Coast were among the earliest to be occupied by Europeans. They both became Portuguese possessions in the sixteenth century, and the latter was known as Elmina by the time it came under British control. By the mid-seventeenth century, the French were in Saint-Louis du Senegal, and the Dutch in Cape Town. By the end of the eighteenth century, the British had solid footing in Cape Town, which was taken from the Dutch East India Company between 1795 and 1803, then from the Batavian Republic in 1806. The British occupied holdings along the coast to Freetown, which became the center for “liberated” slaves in the 1790s.

When the Europeans decided to penetrate into the backcountry, it was, however, a turning point. In 1788, this became the goal of the African Association, a learned society in London that brought together scientists, politicians, and wealthy patrons. It was created for the development of British trade and political prestige inside the continent. This led to another key event in 1795, when the Scottish explorer Mungo Park reached the banks of the Niger River.1 Until then, Europeans had known of the river by hearsay only, if it was, and this is more than doubtful, the same river referred to in antiquity by the geographer Ptolemy and historian Herodotus. The Niger River and the wealth of Timbuktu city, a myth that had been conveyed by Arabs since the city had been closed to Christians, were two geographical mysteries that intellectuals at the end of the Enlightenment hoped to solve.

In the first decades of the nineteenth century, the Western exploratory push into Africa was virtually monopolized by the British. There were only two exceptions: Bonaparte’s adventures in Egypt and two memorable French expeditions: that of Mollien in Senegal in 1819 (the young explorer had survived the sinking of the Méduse off the shore of the Cape Verde peninsula), and especially that of René Caillié in Timbuktu in 1828, though the English cast doubt on the authenticity of his success, since they had not yet been able to

-156-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Africa and the Africans in the Nineteenth Century: A Turbulent History
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 313

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.