Multicultural Counseling: Perspectives from Counselors as Clients of Color

By Aretha Faye Marbley | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

The image of my Great-Great-Grandma Evelina—a slave woman of the 18th century, treading onward through the wilderness of oppression and pain, with an unwavering faith in God and love for her family and a belief in the goodness of humanity—juxtaposed against that of Barack Obama, the first African American president of the United States, has been a source of inspiration. At the same time, both of them are a reminder of how far we have come as African American people and how much farther we have to go.

I am truly humbled by the unselfish sacrifices that so many have made so that I would have this opportunity to reach this level of achievement. Therefore, I begin by thanking my sources of inspiration, my African ancestors; without them, I would not be physically, nor spiritually, nor intellectually what I am today.

I thank Dr. Alice Denham for her sharp editorial eye, her knack for finding just the right words, her unlimited generosity, and, most of all, her sheer bravery to not only edit my work but also enter my world and walk with me on journeys unknown even to me. I would like to thank my dissertation team (though they advised me many years ago), Drs. Larry Burlew, Catherine Roland, the late Nudie Williams, and Nancy Haas, for their patience, guidance, support, and expertise as I completed the original qualitative study. Thanks also to my coauthors, Rachelle, Greg, ShaRhonda, and Julie.

I would also like to thank my participants, Joshua, Shawn, Mai Li, Wai, Angelica, Alexias, Lioma, and Woodro, for making me feel welcome throughout the study. As doctoral students, in many phases, even though they were in the midst of comprehensive exams, internships, finals, and defenses, and later as professionals in the midst of tenure, promotion, publishing, and grant seeking, they created time to talk and meet with me for hours. By opening themselves both personally and professionally (and reopening themselves 12 years later), their generous sharing made rich contributions to this book and has resulted in lifetime bonds and friendships.

Last but not least, I would like to thank the Almighty, and my family and friends (though many they are), for their love and support. A special thanks to my three mothers, Mae Helen, Sareor, and Johnnie, for my life, my spirit, and my soul. Thanks to my sisters and best friends, Juanita and Brenda, and all three sets of siblings: Ruth, the late Levi, Cornelius, James Jr., Norvella, and Carrie; Carol, the late Felecia, Cynthia, and Kim; and Larry (sister-in-law Barbara), the late Lou V., and Jaster. Thanks also to my other family: Bobbie and Cloteel (who are not only cousins but also sisters and friends); my nephews; my nieces, especially

-xiii-

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