Multicultural Counseling: Perspectives from Counselors as Clients of Color

By Aretha Faye Marbley | Go to book overview

4
The Asian and Asian
American Client’s Story
The Myth of the Model Minority

I realized that as we discussed, and as I talked about racial injustices I experienced, I felt the pain of the racial
tensions and oppressions. Issues of race are difficult to talk about. It easily becomes emotionally charged. I am
thinking of some of the class discussions we have had in my classes, both as a student and as an instructor.

Mai Li

Actually, I travel in Canada, I witnessed those Chinese immigrants there. There’s some things that I don’t really
admire about their lifestyle over there. For those immigrants that just migrate over there, they are very afraid
of being laid off. They are very insecure, they are afraid of everything, even though they have their college
degrees. Most of them got their degrees from Hong Kong, maybe that’s another reason why they are afraid.
They don’t even feel good to go out and seek help or services. Maybe, the language is the thing. I learned
from an Australian friend, who is a Chinese who migrated there. For the services to the immigrants, some of
the Chinese don’t join, but she knows that they have the need, but somehow they don’t feel good to join with
those Europeans.

Wai


MIXING APPLES AND ORANGES: THE MASSIVE
DIFFERENCES EXISTING AMONG ASIANS

Say, for example, if I talked about my relationship with my wife, my children, or some of the cultural issues.
It takes more time for me to really trust you or that you will understand. But if you were of the same
culture (unless you are stupid or ignorant), I will trust you more, if the two of you are of the same training
or background.

Wai

-49-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Multicultural Counseling: Perspectives from Counselors as Clients of Color
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 218

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.