Multicultural Counseling: Perspectives from Counselors as Clients of Color

By Aretha Faye Marbley | Go to book overview

7
Gender
Gunpowder and Lead

The women of this world—as the women of Texas, and women of the United States of America—must
exercise a leadership quality, a dedication, a concern, and a commitment which is not going to be shattered
by inanities and ignorance and idiots. … We only want, we only ask, that when we stand up and talk about
one nation under God, liberty, justice for everybody, we only want to be able to look at the flag, put our right
hand over our hearts, repeat those words, and know that they are true.

Barbara Jordan (Blue & Naden, 1992)


GENDER ISSUES

I have had mentoring experiences. Ironically, they have all been with African American males. I have yet to
have a female African American mentor in the program, but I do have an African American female mentor who
kind of guides me along throughout the program, as far as things I should keep in mind; that’s why she has
been there. She is not a professor; she’s an administrator, but she does have a PhD in counseling.

Shawn

This chapter provides an overview of the literature on the experiences of groups of color in mental health based on gender with a subsequent discussion of the experiences of male and female participants of color (in each ethnic and racial group). Using the participants’ experiences as a focal point, it will compare and contrast male and female participants’ responses to the factor of gender bias addressed in Chapters 3 through 6, highlighting the similarities and the gender differences existing within the African Americans’, Asians’, Hispanics and Latinos’, and Native Americans’ experiences with mental health services. The chapter will conclude with multiethnic, multiracial, feminist, and gender implications and recommendations for counseling and psychotherapy with people of color.

Although gender and sex can be seen as overlapping and fluid categories with multiple meanings, gender in this chapter is used to refer primarily to the social experiences and expectations associated with being female or male. Sex refers to

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