Multicultural Counseling: Perspectives from Counselors as Clients of Color

By Aretha Faye Marbley | Go to book overview

Index

A
Acculturation, 13
African Americans and, 34, 40, 42
Asian immigrants and, 150
Hispanic/Latino study participants and, 10, 70, 72, 77, 130, 132
level of, 10, 23
racism and, 16
relocation and, 16
under utilization of mental health resources and, 16
Africa
human evolution and, 32
African American clients
access to mental health and, 147
advocacy and, 146
Afrocentrism and, 143, 145
biases of, 42–43
critical race theory and, 186
culture-centered networks and interventions and, 47, 48, 105–106, 146
diagnoses of, 147
dialogue and, 47, 123
discrimination and, 43, 144–145
early termination and, 37, 46
experiences of, 43
gender and, 42, 97, 101–102, 102–105, 105–106
health insurance and, 124
language of, 47, 48, 123, 181, 183
listening to, 124
male, 38, 39–42, 104–105
negative view of counseling by, 47
poverty and, 43
racism and, 37, 43, 143–144, 145, 146
radicalism and, 146
research and, 31, 146
slavery and, 37, 143, 145 (see also slavery)
social justice and, 143–145, 146–147, 186 (see also social justice)
socioeconomics and, 42–43, 124
spirituality and, 144
trust issues and, 37, 43, 123
White counselors and, 37, 43–44
working with, 124, 143, 144–145, 146
African American community
cohesiveness within, 36–37, 48, 105–106
diversity within, 35
social ills of, 141
social justice and, 145
storytelling and, 24, 33–34
survival of the group and, 36–37, 105
African American men, 143
acculturation and, 40
counseling, 38, 39–42, 104–105
criminal justice system and, 104, 140–141
demasculinization of, 105
education and, 104
expectations about, 101
gender and, 97, 100–102
masculinity and, 101, 104, 166
negative stereotypes of, 38, 104, 105
100 Black Men of America, 142
poverty and, 104
racism and, 101
slavery and, 101, 104 (see also slavery)
unemployment and, 104
violence and, 101
African American mental health professionals, 39–42, 143
acculturation and, 40, 42
credibility of, 43
female, 41–42
male, 39–41, 122, 123–124
multiple perspectives of, 40–41, 42
negative social and environmental stressors and, 43
racial identity and, 41–42
social justice and, 143 (see also social justice)
African American(s) (see also Black Americans)
academics, 37
access to healthcare by, 141–142
acculturation and, 34, 40, 42
Afrocentrism and, 36–37, 41, 143, 145
American Indians and, 33, 82
apology to, 191
assimilation of, 34
assumptions about, 11
Black personality, 145
church and, 145
civil rights movement and, 142
discrimination and, 33
education and, 34, 41, 140
employment issues and, 142
equity for, 139–141, 146–147
forced migration and, 12 (see also African diaspora; slavery)
healing practices and, 15
healthcare issues and, 141–142, 146–147

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