Sgt. Pepper and the Beatles: It Was Forty Years Ago Today

By Olivier Julien | Go to book overview

Notes on contributors

Michael Hannan is Professor of Contemporary Music at Southern Cross University. Australia, where in the mid-1980s he established one of the first university degree programmes to train professional musicians for the popular music industry. Professor Hannan is a composer, rock musician and music researcher. His current research interests are focused on film music and sound theory and on ear training for audio engineers. He also was the Chair of the International Society for Music Education’s Commission for the Education of the Professional Musician from 2004 to 2006.

Ian Inglis is Reader in Popular Music Studies at the University of Northumbria, Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom. His doctoral research considered the significance of sociological, social psychological and cultural theory in explanations of the career of the Beatles. His books include The Beatles, Popular Music and Society: A Thousand Voices (2000), Popular Music and Film (2003), Performance and Popular Music: History, Place and Time (2006) and Perspectives on Popular Music (forthcoming).

Olivier Julien teaches the history and musicology of popular music at the Universities of Paris-Sorbonne (Paris IV) and Paris-Sorbonne Nouvelle (Paris III). During the 1990s, he worked as a songwriter and music journalist while completing studies in Music and Musicology. He graduated in 1999 with a PhD dissertation on the Beatles’ sound and has contributed since then to several publications in France and abroad (L’Education Musicale, Musurgia, Les Cahiers de I’OMF, Analyse Musicale, Canadian University Music Review, British Journal of Music Education, Popular Music, The Continuum Encyclopedia of Popular Music of the World). He is currently an associate member of the JCMP Research Group of the Observatoire Musical Français (Paris IV).

John Kimsey, PhD, serves as Associate Professor in the School for New Learning at DePaul University in Chicago. He teaches and writes about popular music and modern literature and has also worked as a professional musician. His publications include the essays ‘How the Beatles Invented the A-Bomb’ in Proteus: A Journal of Ideas (Spring 2001) and ‘Spinning the Historical Record: Lennon, McCartney and Museum Politics’ in the anthology Reading the Beatles: Cultural Studies, Literary Criticism and the Fab Four (State University of New York Press, 2006). He is also a contributor to the Cambridge Companion to the Beatles, forthcoming in 2008.

Jim LeBlanc is Head of Database Management Services at the Cornell University Library. He holds BA and MA degrees from Miami University (Ohio) and a PhD in French Literature from Cornell University. His current research interests include metadata and library processing workflows, James Joyce and (of course) the Beatles. In addition to his work on librarianship, he has written and/or spoken on Louis-Ferdinand Céline, James Joyce, Alberto Moravia, Jean-Paul Sartre, Joni Mitchell and the Beatles.

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