Themes and Variations in Shakespeare's Sonnets

By J B Leishman | Go to book overview

First-line index of Sonnets
quoted or mentioned
(Note: Those of Shakespeare’s Sonnets which have been merely referred to by number and without quotation are here marked with an asterisk. The Petrarch index includes canzoni as well as sonnets, and the Ronsard index includes a few odes and elegies.)
SHAKESPEARE
Accuse me thus: that I have scanted all (117), p. 228.
Against my love shall be, as I am now (63), pp. 114, 140, 141.
Ah! wherefore with infection should he live (67), pp. 162–3.
As a decrepit father takes delight (37), p. 204.
As an imperfect actor on the stage (23), p. 200.
As fast as thou shalt wane, so fast thou grow’st (11), pp. 140–1.
Being your slave, what should I do but tend (57), pp. 223–4.
*Beshrew that heart that makes my heart to groan (133), p. 12.
*Betwixt mine eye and heart a league is took (47), p. 201, note 2.
But be contented: when that fell arrest (74), pp. 32–3, 37, 61, 62, 89, 112.
But do thy worst to steal thyself away (92), pp. 211–12, 226.
But wherefore do not you a mightier way (16), p. 140.
Devouring Time, blunt thou the lion’s paws (19), pp. 114, 134.
Farewell! thou art too dear for my possessing (87), pp. 181, 228–9.
From you have I been absent in the spring (98), pp. 193–5, 196.
How like a winter hath my absence been (97), pp. 190–3.
How sweet and lovely dost thou make the shame (95), pp. 12, 18.
If my dear love were but the child of state (124), pp. 14–15, 109–12.
*If the dull substance of my flesh were thought (44), p. 201, note 2.
If there be nothing new, but that which is (59), pp. 107–8, 161–2.
If thou survive my well-contented day (32), p. 82.
In loving thee thou know’st I am forsworn (152), p. 12.
Let me confess that we two must be twain (36), p. 227.
Let me not to the marriage of true minds (116), pp. 56–7, 105–7, 123, 208–9.
Let those who are in favour with their stars (25), pp. 14, 110–11, 203.

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