Themes and Variations in Shakespeare's Sonnets

By J B Leishman | Go to book overview

General index
(Note: This index is intended to be useful: no attempt has been made to record every appearance of every proper name.)
ACHILLES, Alexander’s visit to his tomb, 46–7.
Aeschylus, affinity between his hyperboles and impressionistic metaphors and Shakespeare’s, 35–6, 190, 202; his Prometheus defying Zeus quoted as an example of hyperbole, 155, 213; a speech of Clytemnestra to Agamemnon containing phrases like those found in hymns to the gods, 207.
Alexander of Macedon, his visit to the tomb of Achilles, 46–7.
Ariosto, on Nature’s having ‘broken the mould’ with which she made the Duke of Ross, 168–9.
Aristotle, on the ‘youthfulness’ of hyperboles, 154–5, 158.
Arnold, Matthew, on ‘the glorious class of the best’, 58, note 2; his niece wished he would more often be ‘wholly serious’, 222.
Augustus, Emperor, his banishment of Ovid, 39.
Ausonius, his 14th Idyll, Rosae, the most imitated of all ancient treatments of the topic carpe florem, 66.
BACCHYLIDES, on the immortality conferred by poetry, 31.
Bacon, Francis, on the unexpectedly peaceful transition from Elizabeth to James I, 14, note 2; his rendering of a passage from Lucretius quoted, 210.
Bateson, F. W., the kind of thing he finds ‘disturbing’, 158.
Beeching, H. C, accepts the Quarto’s arrangement of the sonnets, 13; on the influence of Shakespeare on Drayton’s sonnets, 14, note 1; excellence of his edition of the Sonnets, 15, note.
Beethoven, a monumental and representative figure, whose face cannot be dissociated from his works, 129–30; what he said of his Pastoral Symphony might be applied to many things in Shakespeare’s Sonnets, 194; Shakespeare may have actually had to endure from his friend such slights and insults as Beethoven was always suspecting, 226–7.
Belleau, Remy, his commentary on Ronsard’s II Amours, 71.
Bible, The, quoted: 1 Corinthians, vi, 19 (‘Your body is the temple of the Holy Ghost’), 150; Galatians, ii, 20 (‘I live, yet not I, but Christ liveth in me’), 217; Hebrews, xi, 1 (‘the substance of things hoped for’), 229; James, i, 17 (‘with whom is no variableness neither shadow of turning’), 108; Job, xix, 26 (‘Though … worms destroy this body’), 34, note; Matthew, xviii, 3 (‘Except ye turn, and become as little children’), 125, note; Song of Solomon, viii, 7 (‘Many waters cannot quench love’), 107.
Blake, William, ‘he who generalises is an idiot’, 118.

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