Surrogate Suburbs: Black Upward Mobility and Neighborhood Change in Cleveland, 1900-1980

By Todd M. Michney | Go to book overview

Epilogue

The trees are full-grown now, but otherwise the trim brick bungalows on Myrtle Avenue in Cleveland’s southeastern corner look much the same as when African American contractor Arthur Bussey built them in 1959.1 Sitting on well-groomed lawns, they are still recognizable by the distinctive “B” incorporated into their decorative front screen doors, but they are otherwise virtually indistinguishable from the typical brick, single-family homes lining the residential streets of nearby Maple Heights and Garfield Heights, or Euclid to the northeast of the city—suburbs to which upwardly mobile, middle-class blacks were moving in increasing numbers by the 1980s. Whereas most of the homeowners on Myrtle Avenue are elderly, the housing on Sunny Glenn Avenue just two blocks to the north was built with a different clientele in mind: young African American professionals. Here, townhouses constructed in the late 1990s resemble those found in the farthest-outlying suburbs like Solon and Aurora. Some have sold for over $200,000—four times the city’s current median home value, and nearly double that for the metropolitan area as a whole, which currently stands at around $125,000. Even in Glenville, where poverty spiked as early as the 1960s, longtime homeowners have admirably maintained their sumptuous homes on East Boulevard and Wade Park Avenue, while younger buyers with more means move into the newly restored “Heritage Lane” houses on East 105th Street or purchase New Urbanist properties built as part of Cleveland’s postindustrial “renaissance.” Long after most upwardly mobile African Americans departed for the suburbs, then, some continue to choose the city as a place to enact their dreams of a better life. Yet, especially since the Great Recession hit in 2008, all has not been well with the black middle class, whether in Cleveland, in its suburbs, or in other metropolitan areas around the country.

Although an in-depth examination is beyond the scope of this book, an overview of Cleveland’s black suburbanization aids in understanding how patterns of geographic mobility played out beyond the neighborhoods discussed here and offers useful perspective on the post-1980 situation faced by the former “surrogate suburbs” of Glenville, Mount Pleasant, and Lee-Miles. The exodus of upwardly mobile African Americans out of the city has followed two main vectors. One points to the northeast, with black families moving into East

-256-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Surrogate Suburbs: Black Upward Mobility and Neighborhood Change in Cleveland, 1900-1980
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 334

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.