Remaking the American University: Market-Smart and Mission-Centered

By Robert Zemsky; Gregory R. Wegner et al. | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

Because our work so often depends upon the insights of the colleagues we entice to join us as participants in our roundtables or as collaborators in research, we have a long list of those to whom we are truly indebted. First, Joan Girgus, Jim Galbally, and Ann Duffield joined us as editors of Policy Perspectives. Ann was responsible for the publication’s style and format as well as purpose. We have, over the years, had three extraordinary sponsors: The Pew Charitable Trusts— Tom Langfitt, Rebecca Rimel, Susan Stine, and Bob Scwhartz; The John S. and James L. Knight Foundation—Creed Black, Hodding Carter, and Rick Love; and the U.S. Department of Education through its funding of the National Center on the Educational Quality of the Workforce (EQW) and subsequently the National Center on Postsecondary Improvement (NCPI). Peter Cappelli of the University of Pennsylvania and Patti Gumport of Stanford University superintended those projects and frequently joined our roundtables.

The members of the original Pew Roundtable require individual recognition: Pat Cross, Darryl Greer, John Gould, Bruce Johnstone, Hank Levin, Art Levine, Arturo Madrid, Pat McPherson, Dolf Norton, Lew Solomon, Glen Stine, Ursula Wagener, Tim Warner, Marna Whittington. It is always dangerous to single out a few from what was fundamentally a collective endeavor; we would be remiss, however, if we did not acknowledge the particular contributions of a few. Pat Callan taught

-ix-

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Remaking the American University: Market-Smart and Mission-Centered
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • 1 - Introduction- the Diminishing of Public Purpose 1
  • 2 - The Lattice and the Ratchet 15
  • 3 - The Admissions Arms Race 32
  • 4 - On Being Mission-Centered and Market-Smart 51
  • 5 - To Publish and Perish 69
  • 6 - A Value Proposition 86
  • 7 - Thwarted Innovation 101
  • 8 - Who Owns Teaching? 123
  • 9 - Making Educational Quality Job One 139
  • 10 - Not Good Enough 161
  • 11 - Crafting a Public Agenda 180
  • 12 - Dancing with Change 198
  • References 219
  • Index 223
  • About the Authors 233
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