The Routledge Companion to Nineteenth Century Philosophy

By Dean Moyar | Go to book overview

THE ROUTLEDGE COMPANION
TO NINETEENTH CENTURY PHILOSOPHY
The nineteenth century is a period of stunning philosophical originality, characterised by radical engagement with the emerging human sciences. Often overshadowed by twentieth century philosophy which sought to reject some of its central tenets, the philosophers of the nineteenth century have re-emerged as profoundly important figures.The Routledge Companion to Nineteenth Century Philosophy is an outstanding survey and assessment of the century as a whole. Divided into seven parts and including thirty chapters written by leading international scholars, the Companion examines and assesses the central topics, themes, and philosophers of the nineteenth century, presenting the first comprehensive picture of the period in a single volume:
German Idealism
Philosophy as political action, including young Hegelians, Marx, and Tocqueville
Rethinking the subject, including Schopenhauer, Kierkegaard, and Nietzsche
Engaging naturalism, including Darwinism, philosophy of race, experimental psychology, and Neo-Kantianism
Utilitarianism and British Idealism
American Pragmatism and Idealism
New Directions in Philosophy of Mind and Logic, including Brentano, Frege, and Husserl.

The Routledge Companion to Nineteenth Century Philosophy is essential reading for students of philosophy, and for anyone interested in this period in related disciplines such as politics, history, literature, and religion.

Dean Moyar is Associate Professor of Philosophy at Johns Hopkins University. He works primarily in German Idealism and has strong interests in political philosophy and in ethics.

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