The Routledge Companion to Nineteenth Century Philosophy

By Dean Moyar | Go to book overview

INDEX
Abbe, Ernst, 859
Abbott, Frank, 478
Abel, Jacob Friedrich, 526–27
Ability of Contemporary Jews and Christians to Become Free (Bauer), 212
Abraham, in Fear and Trembling (Kierkegaard), 348, 353–58, 359, 363, 371, 374
Absolute, in aesthetics, 170, 173–80, 181; presentation of absolute in the arts, 183–90
absolute idealism: dialectic and skepticism, 57–61; and Hegel, 51–61; idealist history of self-consciousness, 55–57; justifying knowledge without first epistemic principles, 52–55
abstract right, 123–24, 155, 158
Achilles’ steps, 411
acquired nexus of psychic life, 565–66
action-self, 95
actual fact, consciousness of, 15
actualism, 476
Adam and Eve, 500
adaptation, 334
Adler, Alfred, 377, 400
Adorno, T., 323
Aenesidemus (Schulze), 17, 44, 45
Aesthetic Letters (Schiller), 715, 739
aesthetics, 165–92; Absolute in see Absolute, in aesthetics; art see art; beauty in, 165, 166, 167, 177–80; and ethics, 344; exceptionality of experience, 340; historical background, 165–68; immediacy, 348–49; method and aims, 170–73; and moral experience, 336–37; presentation of absolute in arts, 183–90; reception and interpretation, 181–83; of revelation, 338; of Schopenhauer, 173, 174, 328, 336–40, 344; system of the arts, 187–89; taste, philosophical, 165, 166
affective nihilism, 386–87
affirmation, 391–92
Agassiz, Louis, 505, 747
agency, free: individual, 144; social constitution of, 134, 142, 143, 153
aggressive drives, 393
agnosticism, 482
agreement, concept, 763
Aids to Reflection (Coleridge), 606
Akedah (binding of Isaac), story of, 353–58, 359, 363
algebra, Boolean, 860, 862
alienation: and Bauer’s philosophy of history, 214; Hegel on, 151; as Marx’s first philosophy of history, 211, 224–28
Allgemeine Brouillon (Novalis), 311–13
Allport, Floyd, 273
altruism, 383, 425
American Journal of Psychology, 548
American Philosophical Association, 772
American Psychological Association, 548, 772
Analysis of the Phenomena of the Human Mind (James Mill), 603–4, 612
Analytic Tradition, 323
ancient Greece: aesthetics of, 166, 167–68, 175, 338; and Nietzsche, 380, 381; see also Greek gods; Greek sculpture; Greek tragedy; individual philosophers, such as Plato
ancient philosophers see Aristotle; Plato; Socrates
An Essay on the Causes of the Variety of Complexion and Figure in the Human Species (Stanhope Smith), 502
animal sumbolicum, human being as, 594
animate nature, 79
animism, 445
anthropology: cultural, 558–63; of Feuerbach, 215–22, 229; moral, 141
Anthropology from a Pragmatic Point of View (Kant), 109, 560
Anti-Christ, The (Nietzsche), 379
Antiquity of Man (Lyell), 472
anti-Semitism, 515
Apel, Karl-Otto, 161
Appearance and Reality (Bradley), 662, 663, 670, 672–74, 679
appearances, 37; and things-in-themselves, xxii, 40–43, 67, 329
approbation component, morality, 490
a priori and a posteriori cognition, 34–35
a priori representations, 8, 9, 14
apriority (agreeableness to reason), 726
architecture, 338
Arendt, Hannah, 498
Aristotle, 173, 378, 481, 606, 695; Brentano on, 841, 842, 843, 850; De anima, 526; De generatione animalium, 513; and logic, 613, 614; Nicomachean Ethics, 650; Organon, 810; and psychology, 523–24
arithmetic, 618, 861–62; philosophy of, 888–91
Arleth, Emil, 839
art: artistic activity, 180–81; artistic representation (unity of form and content), 175–77; beauty in, 177–80; classical, 298; end of, and new mythology, 190–92; future of, 190–92; history and modernity, 189–90; objects of, 170; philosophy of, 168–73; as presentation of absolute in sensible form, 173–80; as self-consciousness, 180; still life painting, 186–87; symbolic content and artistic representation, 175, 176; and Tocqueville, 281; see also aesthetics
arts: fine, 165, 167; philosophies of, 189; presentation of absolute in, 183–90; system of the, 187–89
Aryan race, 507
associationist psychology, 524, 525, 532–34, 565; and Mill, 601, 603–5, 605–6
astronomy, 6
atheism, 482; controversy (1798/99), 49
Athenaeum (journal), 303, 307, 308, 319, 320, 321
atomism, psychological, 542, 545
Attempt at a Critique of All Revelation (Fichte), 44
Attempt at a New Theory of the Human Faculty of Representation (Reinhold), 329

-911-

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