Post Traumatic Stress Disorder: Cognitive Therapy with Children and Young People

By Patrick Smith; Sean Perrin et al. | Go to book overview

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder
Post traumatic stress disorder develops after exposure to one or more terrifying event that has caused or threatened to cause the sufferer grave physical harm. This book discusses how trauma-focused cognitive therapy can be used to help children and adolescents who suffer from post traumatic stress disorder.Cognitive therapy is frequently used to treat adults who suffer from PTSD with proven results. Post Traumatic Stress Disorder provides the therapist with instructions on how CT models can be used with children and young people to combat the disorder. Based on research carried out by the authors, this book covers:
assessment procedures and measures
formulation and treatment planning
trauma-focused cognitive therapy methods
common hurdles.

The authors provide case studies and practical tips, as well as examples of selfreport measures and handouts for young people and their parents, which will help the practitioner to prepare for working with this difficult client group.

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder is an accessible, practical, clinically relevant guide for professionals and trainees in child and adolescent mental health service teams who work with traumatised children and young people.

Online resources:

The appendices of this book provide worksheets that can be downloaded free of charge to purchasers of the print version. Please visit the website www.routledge mentalhealth.com/cbt-with-children to find out more about this facility.

Patrick Smith is a Lecturer in Psychology at the Institute of Psychiatry, King’s College London, and Consultant Clinical Psychologist at the South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust.

Sean Perrin is a Lecturer in Psychology at the Institute of Psychiatry, King’s College London, and team leader for the Child Traumatic Stress Clinic at the South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust.

William Yule is Emeritus Professor of Applied Child Psychology at the Institute of Psychiatry, King’s College London; Consultant Clinical Psychologist; and Founding Director of the Child Traumatic Stress Clinic.

David M. Clark is Professor of Psychology at the Institute of Psychiatry King’s College London; and Director of the Centre for Anxiety Disorders and Trauma, South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust.

-i-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Post Traumatic Stress Disorder: Cognitive Therapy with Children and Young People
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 210

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.