Post Traumatic Stress Disorder: Cognitive Therapy with Children and Young People

By Patrick Smith; Sean Perrin et al. | Go to book overview

3
Assessment
As should be clear from the preceding chapter, post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is not the only outcome of exposure to trauma in children and adolescents. Nevertheless, there is ample evidence that the three symptom clusters of intrusion, avoidance and hyperarousal are the most common reaction in children and adolescents, regardless of trauma type, severity or duration (Perrin et al. 2004). Further evidence in support of a careful PTSD post-trauma assessment comes from two important findings. First, the presence of PTSD significantly increases the risk of additional disorders over time, but these additional disorders tend to remit as the PTSD resolves (Bolton et al. 2004). Second, in controlled trials of cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) targeted at PTSD, co-morbid symptoms of anxiety and depression also improve even though such symptoms are not targeted directly (Smith et al. 2007; see also Stallard 2006). This is not to say that clinicians should ignore the assessment or treatment of co-morbid conditions. However, it suggests that detailed assessment and treatment of PTSD symptoms is likely to have significant beneficial effects beyond PTSD itself. Issues relating to the timing of assessment and treatment are discussed later in Chapter 8. As an overview, the initial assessment will involve:
a joint parent and child meeting to describe the interview process
completion of standardised, self-report measures
separate parent and child interviews
a joint parent and child meeting to feedback and arrange for further assessment if necessary.
The aims of this first assessment are:
to establish rapport and an empathic environment
to gain an understanding of the child’s pre-trauma functioning

-29-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Post Traumatic Stress Disorder: Cognitive Therapy with Children and Young People
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 210

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.