Understanding the Steiner Waldorf Approach: Early Years Education in Practice

By Janni Nicol; Jill Tina Taplin | Go to book overview

4
The environment

Introduction

In this chapter, we describe the various environments that may make up the Steiner Waldorf early-childhood setting. The sensory experience of the child has a great significance for his or her development. For this reason, the Steiner kindergarten environment requires much careful thought and detailed attention and is distinctively different from most settings for young children. We shall consider the effect on the young child of beauty, colour, natural materials, seasonal and other decorations, the equipment for domestic activity indoors and the complimentary environments outdoors. The materials available for the children’s play in the Steiner setting are described and the adults’ role as an important part of the environment will be discussed.

The first sight of a Steiner kindergarten room can make a striking impression on an adult visitor. The soft colours and textures, the natural materials, the use of flowers, branches, seed pods and other seasonal decorations and the homely sight of simple kitchen equipment, mending baskets, even a spinning wheel, all combine to show that this is a special place. Steiner kindergartens are situated in many different kinds of buildings including purpose-built spaces, church and other community halls, adapted houses and temporary structures such as yurts. Wherever it is, for the Steiner practitioner, one of the first priorities is to make it both a beautiful and a functional place. These are spaces for children designed to be visually attractive, to be practical, to be nurturing and to exemplify a core principle of the Steiner Waldorf early-childhood curriculum – enabling children to be involved in the everyday tasks of living. It is a space that will give the visitor much information about what the children actually do in a Steiner Waldorf kindergarten.

-38-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Understanding the Steiner Waldorf Approach: Early Years Education in Practice
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 176

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.