Indigenous Nations and Modern States: The Political Emergence of Nations Challenging State Power

By Rudolph C. Rÿser | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

No one actually conceives of and writes a volume like this alone, even though the whole enterprise is isolating and lonely. I am indebted to a good many people for their support, encouragement and confidence throughout the years of conceiving the ideas and the past few years of actually writing the manuscript. Chief George Manuel, leader of the Secwepemc Nation, was before his death in 1989 a good friend, a brother and powerful influence whose life is in many ways written in the words I put to page. George was a tower of strength who never let his weaknesses for alcohol, for women and feasting get in the way of his personal mission to protect native peoples’ lands from confiscation by states and corporations. In the last 20 years of his life, George changed the world and he changed how nations project what he called the Fourth World Reality. Sam Cagey, chairman of the Lummi Nation and a wonderfully spirited leader for many people in Indian Country also passed into the spirit world, but he too played an important role in my work. Sam was a tireless advocate and spokesman for Indian Rights. He would not compromise the right, but he understood well how to agree to small compromises to achieve the big goal. Though I knew him for only a brief time, Bruno Gabriel, a 23-year-old Miskito commander and a poet who died under a hail of bullets and bombs sent by the Sandinistas from Nicaragua affirms for me the courage necessary to open people’s eyes. His legacy lives on in the hearts of Miskito people in Yapti Tasba along the Nicaraguan coast. Mel Tonasket of the Colvilles, Kathleen Bishop of the Snohomish, Ozzie George of the Cour d’Alenes, Russell Jim of the Yakama, Lucy Covington of the Colvilles, Sherwin Broadhead an attorney and friend, Ken Hanson of the Samish Nation, Bobbi Miller-Minnis of the Colvilles, a colleague and friend in my early career in Indian Affairs; Cal Peters of the Squaxins, and Joe DeLaCruz, president of the Quinault Nation are some of the people who played a large role in forming my ideas over the years. I will always be thankful to Joe Tallakson, a friend, confidant and teacher for his sensitive and unrelenting support of my work over the years and equally thankful to his work-partner Juliet Pittman. I am thankful to Carol Minugh for her constant encouragement and suggestion that I pursue my doctorate, and to John H. Burrows for his interest in my work when he was an undergraduate

-xvii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Indigenous Nations and Modern States: The Political Emergence of Nations Challenging State Power
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 302

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.