Indigenous Nations and Modern States: The Political Emergence of Nations Challenging State Power

By Rudolph C. Rÿser | Go to book overview

6
THE LABORATORY OF EXTERNAL
POLITICAL CHANGE
Just as many nations are engaged in internal political changes, others are seeking changes in their external relations. There are numerous examples of nations actively forming new political identities in relation to the United Nations and neighboring states. In 2011 the Palestinians turned directly to the United Nations to establish a new status as a state after years of failed negotiations with the Israeli government. The peoples of south Sudan declared their independence from Sudan and took a seat at the United Nations as the state of South Sudan. Nations’ political initiatives often threatened neighboring states, but tended to infuse the international community with even greater diversity, demanding greater political sophistication in states’ governments and their conduct of foreign affairs. The Lummi Nation, Catalan Nation, and the Federation of Micronesia broadened their political options, by pressing for a negotiated elevation of political status. Testing the waters, these and other nations defined Associated Nation status, Independently Federated Nation status, and Independent Nation-State status as steps toward full political development.
Associated Nation
Exercise inherent powers of governmentfull internal sovereignty.
Government- to-government relationslimited external sovereignty.
Partial economic self-sufficiency.

Lummi Nation

The Lummi Indian Nation is located near the northwest border of the United States and Canada. It is a wholly likely candidate to blaze a new pathway in the political relations between Indian nations and the United States. In 1990, the Lummi Indian Nation became one of the four Indian nations to first negotiate bi-lateral treaties with the United States government—none had done so since 1871. The agreement they and the Quinault, Hoopa and Jamestown S’Klallam individually negotiated was the first in a series of new agreements to aid these Indian nations to resume the exercise of self-government. After concluding

-112-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Indigenous Nations and Modern States: The Political Emergence of Nations Challenging State Power
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 302

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.