Indigenous Nations and Modern States: The Political Emergence of Nations Challenging State Power

By Rudolph C. Rÿser | Go to book overview

8
DISPATCHES FROM THE
FOURTH WORLD

While traveling throughout the Fourth World I would jot down thoughts, observation and comments about the events of the day. I think of these notes as dispatches that should have been written for the conventional press or really just notes from my journal. Unfortunately, the conventional press and journalists generally rarely see what is actually happening in the Fourth World, and certainly they do not apply the perspective of Fourth World peoples. Virtually all of this volume describes the political development of Fourth World nations divided into various categories. Dispatches tend to be less categorical and more reflective of stories as they happen. I share them with you in part because I think they give another flavor of the Fourth World perspective. Some of the pieces mirror parts of this volume, but speak to topics in the context of the moment. I want to share some of these moments so that whether one agrees with the perspective or not it may be possible to appreciate the ideas. Here are 13 dispatches.


Indigenous Nations Must Ratify Genocide Conventions!

Dateline: August 12, 1999, Frankfurt, Germany. The Croatian ex-militiaman’s confession to acts of torture committed against Serbians in the carnage that took place after the collapse of Yugoslavia demands our full attention and the vigorous action of indigenous nations’ governments. Former Croatian militiaman and former civilian police officer, Miro Bajaramovic, speaking in an interview with the Federal Tribune, an independent Croatian newspaper, confessed to a deep sense of “guilt and bitterness” for killing 72 people “with my own hands.” Mr. Bajaramovic’s guilt concerned his torturing and killing of men and women (some of whom he knew personally), both Croatians and Serbs. His bitterness was at the failure of leading Croations to reward him for his services. It was the combination of these deep emotions that prompted Mr. Bajaramovic to tell the world of his crimes and the criminal role of 400 other Croatians—many still holding high office in the Croatian government.

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