Indigenous Nations and Modern States: The Political Emergence of Nations Challenging State Power

By Rudolph C. Rÿser | Go to book overview

INDEX
Abenaki 1, 40, 41 43
Abourezek, Senator James 50, 63, 222
Adams, Hank 60
Adua, Umaru Yar’ 179
Afar 24
Afghanistan 25, 45
Africa: human suffering in 190–1; wars in 24, 159, 159; see also individual countries
African National Congress 28
Agenda 21 193
al Qaeda 14, 141, 143
Algonquin 1, 2, 3, 42
ALPROMISU 103, 104
American Indian Declaration of Indian Purpose (1961) 50, 58, 59, 60
American Indian Declaration of Sovereignty (1974) 50, 222
American Indian Movement (AIM) 60, 197, 200
American Indian nations 49–72, 112, 173, 201, 210, 220–5; AIM demonstrations and Twenty-Point Position Paper 60–1; and American Indian Policy Review Commission 50, 63–4, 222–3; and Appropriation Act (1871) 54, 56; erosion of governmental powers 52–5; formation of new organizations 60; and government-to-government relations 49, 50, 64–5, 66, 67, 68–9, 72, 220–1, 224, 225; and Great Society programs 59–60; and Indian Self-Determination Act (1975) 114, 222; and Major Crimes Act (1885) 54–5; and National Congress of American Indians 46, 50, 56–8, 61, 63, 80, 81, 197, 222; and National Council on Indian Opportunity (NCIO) 221–2; negotiation of self-governance compacts 50, 52, 65–7, 68–9, 71, 72, 112–13, 117, 118–20, 225; obstacles to self-government 52–6; obstruction of self-determination by Bureau of Indian Affairs 58–9; path to restoration of self-government 56–65; and plenary power of Congress 55–6; pursuit of self-determination 49, 51–2; and ‘termination policy’ 58, 61; tribal self-governance demonstration project 67–9, 114–18, 119; see also Lummi Nation
American Indian Policy Review Commission 50, 63–4, 222–3
American Indian Treaty Council 200
American Revolution 20
Amin, Idi 27
Amnesty International 27, 201
Anishinabek 40
Anti-Slavery Society 201, 212–13
Antoine v. Washington (1975) 53
Argentina 16
Aristotle 90
Assembly of First Nations (AFN) 85
associated nation 89, 91, 96, 112–20; characteristics 96, 112; country examples 96; Lummi Nation 112–20
Asyrian Empire 11
Australia 173
Australian Aboriginals 37
Austro-Hungarian Empire 94, 95, 121
authoritarianism 29, 30
autonomous nation 89, 94–5, 96, 102–10; characteristics 95, 102; country

-289-

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