Renewing Black Intellectual History: The Ideological and Material Foundations of African American Thought

By Adolph Reed Jr.; Kenneth W. Warren et al. | Go to book overview

Part II
The Jim Crow Era

What we typically recognize today as black American politics and thought emerged most crucially in relation to the regime of codified white supremacy that was imposed in all of the American South and in modified forms in border states and elsewhere in the decade or so on either side of the turn of the twentieth century. The Jim Crow regime and the struggle against it was a central problematic shaping forms and expressions of black Americans’ race-conscious activity—strategic action, reflection, and debate—for at least two-thirds of the twentieth century. It was within the segregation era that the black American population became primarily urban and spread outside the South. Put perhaps more dramatically, it was in this era that a great deal of what most of us recognize, or imagine we do, about black Americans came into existence. From this perspective, it is not surprising that Part II is the largest section of this book.

The chapters in Part I consider the intellectual and political tendencies and dynamics—national and regional—out of which the segregationist social order took shape and examine black Americans’ interpretive and programmatic responses to them. The chapters in Part II explore different moments of black thought and practice during the long Jim Crow era. William Jones’s “How Black ‘Folk’ Survived in the Modern South” explores Zora Neale Hurston’s development of a dialectical approach to the study of black cultural and economic transformation in the industrializing South of the 1920s and 1930s, noting how her own perceptions evolved as she confronted the complexity and fluidity of cultural practices that challenged static notions of racial authenticity. Kenneth Warren’s “An Inevitable Drift?” explores, through a reading of the 1928 novel Dark Princess, tensions within W. E. B. Du Bois’s elaboration of race-conscious politics and his ambivalent commitments to democracy and oligarchy in the 1920s. Touré Reed, in “The Educational Alliance and the Urban League in New York,” examines some similar tensions through comparison of black and Jewish group advocacy and uplift organizations and the class character of

-51-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Renewing Black Intellectual History: The Ideological and Material Foundations of African American Thought
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 324

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.