Exposure Treatments for Anxiety Disorders: A Practioner's Guide to Concepts, Methods, and Evidence-Based Practice

By Johan Rosqvist | Go to book overview

Preface

Once upon a time, there was a practitioner who discovered he had turned into a believer.

I used to think that if only a good therapeutic relationship could be established, then everything else would work itself out. After all, my original training was in object relations, and I had come to understand that “salvation” lay in healing connections. I was partially mistaken. Instead, I came to see that relationship was important, very important, but that it did not seem to be enough for many patients with whom I worked. They needed something else, something more. They needed symptom relief. Without it, they continued suffering. I came to believe that symptoms played a pivotal, if not central, role in the maintenance and worsening of psychopathology, and, as such, I came to see, incrementally at first, but then more and more, that symptoms alone are legitimate treatment targets. New lives can be built on the absence of symptoms, but not on their presence. While still attending closely to connection, I began specifically treating symptoms more and more and increasingly discovered that patients actually recovered, something I had not previously found.

I was astonished as this phenomenon repeated itself time and time again when I focused on reducing symptoms. To explore and better understand what I was creating, I began reading the literature of early learning theorists, and then that of more modern cognitive-behaviorists; it was almost like reading the journals of Galileo or Christopher Columbus. At first it seemed like such heresy, but with mounting successes following application of behavioral theories of learning and conditioning, I could no longer ignore or suppress what I was witnessing. I also began to feel much less like a heretic, enough so that I obtained formal training in behavior therapy. In this life, I now feel obliged to provide care that works, really works, because human suffering, especially when unnecessary, must be ameliorated. Thus these days I have to report I am a true convert, a believer, someone who has “seen the light,” and with this practitioner’s handbook, I hope to share with you, the reader, both theoretical and

-xi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Exposure Treatments for Anxiety Disorders: A Practioner's Guide to Concepts, Methods, and Evidence-Based Practice
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 256

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.