Teaching Secondary Science: Constructing Meaning and Developing Understanding

By Keith Ross; Liz Lakin et al. | Go to book overview

Preface

Our approach to teaching secondary science is based on a hope that future generations will take better care of the planet than at present. We take an approach to learning where we expose children’s existing ideas, so they can be challenged or built on to enable them to understand their environment and build a sustainable future.

Although we have in mind those learning to become science teachers this book should be an inspiration to those well into their teaching careers. The book is divided into five parts – each of which has an important introduction.

Part I starts with an exemplary lesson and asks ‘What is science and why do we teach it?’

Part II warns us that pupils come to school with ideas about the way the world works which are often very different from our scientific ideas and gives support for ways to enable pupils to come to a scientific understanding of their world through a host of active learning techniques.

Part III gives some support in teaching difficult scientific concepts.

Part IV tackles one of the major concerns that new teachers have: managing the classroom, and we start with the need for careful planning.

Finally Part V deals with other aspects of becoming a professional teacher and introduces a bit of educational history and philosophy.


There are two linked resources supporting this book

The Scitutors website, in association with the Association for Science Education (ASE), now has downloadable support material for tutors in science education and their students, including many links to other useful websites (visit www.scitutors.org. uk/resources/scitutors).

Science Issues and the National Curriculum (Ross et al. 2002), covers most of the topics covered in a secondary science curriculum. It is a self-learning resource which uses initial elicitation questions to identify possible alternative ideas and challenges them where necessary thereby developing an understanding in science. The science is set in everyday or environmental contexts, an approach that we put forward in this book. It is available, free, as the zipped folder entitled ‘CD Rescources’ at www.routledge. com/books/details/9781138833425. (You should also download the accompanying topic map and instructions ‘PDF Science Issues’.) Once downloaded and unzipped, double click the Dr icon Science.exe to run the resource. It is set at around GCSE

-x-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Teaching Secondary Science: Constructing Meaning and Developing Understanding
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 257

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.