Vox Populi: The O'Shaughnessy Files

By William O’Shaughnessy | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

For openers, I’m grateful, beyond my capacity to express it, to Fordham University Press, the great Jesuit publishing house in New York City. Operating from their ancient three-story building just off the Fordham campus in the Bronx, the Press has earned an international reputation for scholarship—which I hope I have not damaged or diminished with my clumsy efforts.

The Press’s former director Saverio Procario, an old Rockefeller Republican, has been my friend and mentor for many years. During his tenure as director, the Press grew in stature and influence; it now publishes more than forty books of scholarship and regional history each year.

Mr. Procario’s unique genius has been continued by his successors and their talented associates. And by five other great souls at the Press to whom I’m indebted for their extraordinary interest in all four of my books. Margaret Noonan is the great definer and protector of Fordham University Press (when she’s not rooting for that other magnificent Bronx institution, her beloved Yankees). Kate O’Brien uses her considerable influence with booksellers and the media to find shelf space for my books all over the country. But first we had to produce the four books that bear my poor name and Fordham’s prestigious imprimatur, and for their production and design I was privileged to rely on the creativity and judgment of Loomis Mayer, who knows all the levers and secrets of publishing. I’m especially grateful to Loomis, and to the Press’s brilliant new director, Fredric Nachbaur. I liked Fred instantly when I came bearing my latest manuscript, and this book would not have had a chance without his blessing and encouragement. And for his relentless genius, good humor, and dazzling skills as a copy editor, I’m immensely grateful to the Press’s managing editor, Eric Newman, for cleaning up my act and making it worthy of a great publishing house with an international reputation.

All their worthy and scholarly publishing activities and literary efforts are, of course, informed by the example and vision of two

-xxiii-

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