Vox Populi: The O'Shaughnessy Files

By William O’Shaughnessy | Go to book overview

THE UNDOING OF DON IMUS

Jonathan Bush, author of this commentary, is a brother of
President George H.W. Bush, an uncle of President George
W. Bush, and the father of rising TV–radio star William
“Billy” Bush. His own father was the U.S. senator from
Connecticut Prescott Bush. Jon is a successful investor
based in New Haven. He and his wife, Jodi, never fail to
remind us that their son and heir, Billy, got his start at
WVOX. Young Mr. Bush is destined for even greater
stardom. Jim Griffin, the uber-agent at the Paradigm
Agency, told me that Billy Bush could be the next Johnny
Carson. Meanwhile, his classy father retains a keen
interest in the great issues of the day. This was his take
on the silencing of the I-Man.

Much has been written and much said about the firing of Don Imus. After the recent appearance of Hillary Clinton at Rutgers, opportunistically pandering away, if a little late, about rising up against those who might disparage minorities or women, I felt compelled to speak up. So here goes.

About ten years ago, my company moved from New York to New Haven, and I undertook the daily grind of a forty-minute morning drive to work. In that first year I tuned my radio to Don Imus and have listened to him at least two or three days a week ever since. At times I found his show funny; at other times I would turn off the radio violently as he talked to politicians who did not exactly share my point of view. The show offered a welcome escape to the caged listener.

From laugh-out-loud-funny skits to serious political discussions to interviews with politicians to authors of books to country and western singers, no show presented an attention-getting format remotely close to that of “Imus in the Morning.” Through it all, the mercurial Imus rode with effortless charisma, guiding the program with a sure hand and a deft instinct for humor. His long-suffering

-5-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Vox Populi: The O'Shaughnessy Files
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 700

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.