Vox Populi: The O'Shaughnessy Files

By William O’Shaughnessy | Go to book overview

INTERVIEW WITH
RALPH R. MARTINELLI

Ralph Martinelli, the conservative publisher who owned weekly
newspapers in Westchester, was a fiery, feisty fellow who knew
no fear. He was a royal pain to many smug politicians and a
real “townie” newspaperman with whom I disagreed
politically on almost every proposition, but I came to have
great respect for the man. His passing left a void in the
Golden Apple. For one thing, it’s a lot quieter here in the
Heart of the Eastern Establishment. Martinelli’s papers are
now in the care and keeping of Nick Sprayregan and his
hard-working editor Dan Murphy. Our interview with Ralph
Martinelli aired January 6, 2004.

WILLIAM O’SHAUGHNESSY (W.O.): We begin the New Year with a conversation with one of Westchester’s most controversial citizens, the veteran publisher known as the “enfant terrible” of the public press. His name is Ralph Martinelli, and he runs all those Martinelli weekly newspapers, including the new “official” newspaper of Yonkers. It’s a sweet victory for you, Mr. Martinelli.

RALPH MARTINELLI (R.M.): It certainly is. It was a long time coming.

W.O.: Ralph, you have taken on damn near everybody: Governor Pataki, Jeanine Pirro. How do you see your role as journalist and publisher?

R.M.: I believe newspapers should expose corruption in local government. There is plenty of it in Westchester County, as we’ve been pointing out. And the Post, the Daily News, and other papers are exposing it as well. But we’re weekly publications. And the Journal News isn’t inclined to expose corruption. They’re only inclined to count their money.

W.O.: They call you Westchester’s last angry man. But those who know you say, “That isn’t the real Ralph Martinelli. He’s a pussycat, a really nice guy.”

-100-

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