Vox Populi: The O'Shaughnessy Files

By William O’Shaughnessy | Go to book overview

THE NEW YORK STATE BROADCASTERS
HALL OF FAME INDUCTION CEREMONY,
FIFTIETH-ANNIVERSARY CONFERENCE

Somebody once said that if you stick around long enough,
they’re bound to honor you for something. But it was a
great honor to be among the very first inductees into the
New York State Broadcasters Hall of Fame. Practically
every single one of the other members has made greater
contributions. But as the statewide organization, headed
by Joe Reilly, is a great champion of free broadcasting, I
was grateful for their wonderful, if undeserved, gesture.
For more about NYSBA, we recommend Serving Their
Communities by Stephen Warley. It’s a great fifty-year
history of broadcasting in the Empire State. These are the
remarks I prepared for delivery at The Sagamore in
Bolton Landing, New York, on June 26, 2005.

To be thought worthy of the company of your other twenty-four really worthy and altogether distinguished inductees, including William S. Paley, Walter Cronkite, the Gambling family, Sue Simmons, Thomas S. Murphy, Chuck Scarborough, and Frankie Crocker, is a great honor. You could poll our profession and find any number more worthy of this great honor. But you won’t find anyone more grateful than Bill O’Shaughnessy.

This fraternity brings back memories and friendships of a lifetime: Tony Malara, Joe Reilly, Dick Novik, Marty Beck, Jim Champlin, Ed McLaughlin, Bob Bruno, Gordon Hastings, Phil Beuth, Dick Foreman, Ambassador Peter Straus, and my oldest friend, John Kelly.

I want to thank Ed Levine and Steve Baboulis, two great chairmen, for establishing a Hall of Fame in the first place and then commissioning the fifty-year history of the association. It’s going to be a stunning and comprehensive retrospective. In fact, the staff at Fordham University Press, that great Jesuit institution in the City of New

-109-

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