Vox Populi: The O'Shaughnessy Files

By William O’Shaughnessy | Go to book overview

M. PAUL REDD DIES SUDDENLY!

M. Paul Redd was a windmill-tilter—which automatically
made him a friend of our radio stations. Here are our
comments about his legacy and also Governor Mario
Cuomo’s January 9, 2009, thoughts on Paul Redd’s
passing.

One of Westchester’s most prominent and durable African American leaders has died.

Word came from the office of New York state Assemblyman George Latimer that M. Paul Redd died suddenly last night of a massive heart attack. He was in his mid-eighties.

Paul Redd published the Westchester County Press, which only this year celebrated its eightieth anniversary as the county’s only blackowned newspaper.

Paul Redd purchased the weekly many years ago from the late Dr. Alger Adams. In addition to his publishing activities, M. Paul Redd was very active in New York state and Westchester politics, serving as vice chairman of the state Democratic Party for many years. He was married to political activist Orial Redd, and their daughter Paula Redd Zeeman is the county’s Director of Human Resources.

He was also a fixture at many WVOX broadcasts. For almost forty years, Mr. Redd attended this station’s St. Patrick’s Day salute broadcasts. (WVOX dedicated this year’s broadcast to Mr. Redd.)

One of the features of his newspaper was the “Snoopy Allgood” column, which tweaked politicians in a good-natured, if occasionally pointed, way. Mr. Redd never revealed who actually wrote those Snoopy Allgood columns.

He was also a frequent guest on WVOX’s radio and TV talk shows and discussion programs.

I remember that the paper announced my wedding thusly: “Automobile heiress NANCY CURRY is getting married to broadcaster WILLIAM O’SHAUGHNESSY … she must be desperate!” (I spent the last 20

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