Vox Populi: The O'Shaughnessy Files

By William O’Shaughnessy | Go to book overview

MARIO CUOMO, ESQ., TALKS
ABOUT MARTHA STEWART,
THE JUDICIAL SYSTEM, AND,
ALWAYS, ABOUT MR. LINCOLN

We imposed upon Governor Cuomo’s brilliant legal mind
on March 16, 2004, to pose certain judicial questions that
were in the headlines at the time.

WILLIAM O’SHAUGHNESSY (W.O.): The newspapers are filled with stories about Martha Stewart’s legal troubles, and she may go to jail. Our guest today, Mario Cuomo, a former governor of New York, has appointed hundreds of judges to the Appellate Division and to the New York State Supreme Court, and could himself have been sitting this very day on the Supreme Court of the United States of America. Governor, did you follow the Martha Stewart trial?

GOVERNOR MARIO CUOMO (M.C.): I followed it every day. My son Christopher, as a matter of fact, is covering it for ABC. I haven’t followed it the way I would if I were an attorney in the case and were going to handle an appeal. So I don’t know all the details, but what I know has produced some strong feelings.

W.O.: Governor, do you know Robert Morvillo, her lawyer?

M.C.: I know him by reputation as an excellent attorney. From what I saw of the trial, he was a consummate professional. He’s a very bright guy and knows what he’s doing. Unfortunately, he didn’t have enough material to work with to do well.

W.O.: Governor, Rosie O’Donnell and all those stars—Bill Cosby, et al.—do you think they helped or hurt her?

M.C.: They probably did a little of both. And this is a case, Bill, where lawyers must use common sense, because no one knows for sure how jurors think. Even when some of them come out later and speak about the case, who knows how much they tell you about what was in their hearts and minds while they sat in that box?

-147-

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