Vox Populi: The O'Shaughnessy Files

By William O’Shaughnessy | Go to book overview

BARBARA TAYLOR BRADFORD:
“A WOMAN OF SUBSTANCE”

We have been most fortunate to enjoy a friendship with a
number of today’s greatest writers (every one of them
more accomplished and gifted of pen than Yours Truly!).
Though we can’t hold a candle to her ability to craft a
story, Barbara Taylor Bradford graciously includes my
family in her circle. This warm, wonderful writer spoke
candidly with us about her career on August 17, 2006.

WILLIAM O’SHAUGHNESSY (W.O.): Today, we are visiting one of the great legends of publishing at her spectacular abode overlooking the East River in Manhattan, the great journalist, author, and writer Barbara Taylor Bradford. Mrs. Bradford, my wife, Nancy O’Shaughnessy, is crazy about you, and I am an admirer of your famous husband, Robert Bradford, the movie producer. Will you trust me to conduct myself fairly and properly? (laughter)

BARBARA TAYLOR BRADFORD (B.T.B.): Of course I will, Bill! But, please, call me Barbara, as you do when the four of us are together of an evening. “Mrs. Bradford” makes me sound like an old lady.

W.O.: Okay, have it as you will, Barbara, I’m not trying to embarrass you, but you are published in over ninety countries in forty languages, and have sold 75 million books! You’re a damned industry!

B.T.B.: That’s right, more or less. (laughter) Worldwide, of course, not just in America or England. It’s probably gone up a bit actually—hopefully. (laughter)

W.O.: Has it made you rich?

B.T.B.: Of course it has. It would be silly to say otherwise. That’s not why I do the work, though. We all want to have money, of course. But I simply like to write.

W.O.: You just started writing books, your novels, in a mid-life “correction,” after an illustrious career as a reporter in Great Britain?

-166-

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