Vox Populi: The O'Shaughnessy Files

By William O’Shaughnessy | Go to book overview

GOVERNOR MARIO M. CUOMO
ON A GRIM ELECTION DAY, 2004

Governor Mario Cuomo remains one of our most astute
political observers, and we often solicit his analyses so
that we can better understand the great issues of the day.

WILLIAM O’SHAUGHNESSY (W.O.): It’s Election Day 2004, with Bush against Kerry. Let’s switch now to Manhattan, to the wise Conscience of the Democratic Party. We had to wait in line because everyone in the country is calling him today: Governor Mario Cuomo. Thank you, sir. Did you vote?

GOVERNOR MARIO CUOMO (M.C.): I did, very early this morning, Bill, in the midst of a very large crowd, at six o’clock.

W.O.: Governor, I hear you vote with a lot of Republicans!

M.C.: It looked like there were a lot of Republicans there this morning. And they seemed quite confident, probably because the president said this morning he was going to win. And we all know the president has the True Word being delivered to him at all times. So that was enough to give these people a good day—at least until the exit polls come out.

W.O.: Governor, didn’t you tell another interviewer today—you have been everywhere on radio and television—there was kind of an “intensity” to it all?

M.C.: Normally, when you stand on line on Election Day, there is conversation and chitchat back and forth and a kind of gentility, a kind of fun aspect to it, no matter what side you’re on. I didn’t detect that. This morning there was a kind of grim intensity to it—not hostility by any means, but intensity. People were not bantering like they normally would, and I think that’s a reflection of the issues that have made this such a compelling election: 9/11 and Iraq. There are plenty of domestic problems as well, and since the Bush Administration took over, a lot of things have gone wrong and there are a lot of things to complain about. I think, basically, the memory of 9/11, the existence of the war in Iraq—

-177-

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